Author Topic: Wind farms and effects on birdlife  (Read 16757 times)

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Offline Technopat

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #40 on: December 02, 2007, 02:04 AM »
Thanx for that, Caesar.
Your onboard wind turbine obviously charges the batteries enough for you to get plenty of keyboard work done.
Regs.,
Technopat
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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #40 on: December 02, 2007, 02:04 AM »

Offline Technopat

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #41 on: December 12, 2007, 18:20 PM »
Greetings All,
Stop me if you've heard this one before ... but I've only just come across this reference, published yesterday, to the Ministerio de Industria, Turismo y Comercio's plan for sea-based wind parks (?) (parques eólicos marinos):
http://www.mityc.es/NR/rdonlyres/A39928E4-214A-4CF7-909C-CFEAD7FB9494/23639/NPEstudioestratgicolitoralespaol111208.pdf

It refers to a study leading to the
Quote
la construcción y ampliación de las instalaciones de generación de electricidad que se encuentren ubicadas físicamente en zonas marinas.
(more or less: the construction and extension of electricity generating facilities located in marina areas) and shows a map with coastal areas coloured according to their suitability as future locations and prior to licences being granted.

Any feedback?

Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
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Offline Technopat

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #42 on: December 12, 2007, 18:25 PM »
Floating wind parks?
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
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Offline Clive

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #43 on: December 12, 2007, 18:32 PM »
Hi Tp,

It seems that there is a big push towards offshore wind power systems.. The Uk is on a fast track to add 7000 of these by as early as 2020

BBC link about it at
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/7135930.stm

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Offline Clive

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #44 on: December 12, 2007, 18:50 PM »
Heres the map,

Green for Ok
yellow for maybe with restrictions
red for environmental impact or difficult situation...

It would be interesting to see the plans that Portugal has for these type of wind power installations...

Of course if and when these new systems are installed. Will the ones in stupid places like tarifa be taken down? Will the ones in Aragon chopping up raptors be taken down?

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Offline nick

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #45 on: February 22, 2008, 10:22 AM »
From the BBC (Thursday, 21 February 2008)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/working_lunch/7256687.stm

What does the Iberian wolf think about renewable energy?

Not much, it seems.

Three packs of wolves range across the mountains above the Minho valley in northern Portugal, just beside zones marked out for the biggest wind farm in Europe.

The wolves had to be tracked by satellite to see what they got up to once the building work started. Not surprisingly, they were frightened off.

As the first wind turbines were finished and a measure of peace returned to some of the hilltops, they started to move tentatively back into the area.

The wolves, an endangered species, are witnessing a monumental change in the way Portugal is powered.

They will have to get used to these turbines and more, because 120 are being installed at Alto Minho. The project is backed by the French electricity company, EDF.

The government wants 45% of the country's electricity to come from renewables such as wind, hydro, and solar by 2010. And that's just a start.

"This challenge will create a new industrial revolution," Portugal's economy minister, Manuel Pinho, told the BBC.

"The countries that move first will have an advantage," he added.

Just by way of comparison, the UK's ambition is to raise the share from renewables from 5% to 10% over the next three years.

If Portugal's revolution succeeds, the country will rank with Sweden and Denmark at the top of the European league for renewables. The economy will be transformed and so will the landscape.

Ten new dams


Portugal has a head start because in the past it developed a large amount of hydro-electric power. Now all useful rivers are to be dammed, which means that ten new dams will be built. Several more are being upgraded.

An extraordinary solar power station, the biggest in the world, is changing the face of the Alentejo, Portugal's sun-baked southern plain. 2,500 solar trackers, nearly as big as tennis courts, are being lined up in rows across a 130 hectare site.

And Alto Minho is just the latest in a string of wind farms which will crowd mountain tops down the length of the country, supplying 12% of its electricity.

We don't have oil, we don't have coal," points out Jose Miguel Oliveira, the manager of Minho Valley Wind Development.

"So we have to use what we have and wind is one of the resources we have."

It's true that if you include transport and heating, Portugal depends on imported fossil fuels for 85% of its energy needs.

But even in a country which has embraced renewable power there are misgivings about the rapid rate of development.

Popular protest

One controversial project is the dam earmarked for the River Tua, inland from the city of Porto. A 25-mile lake will be created along a valley famous for its juniper and cork forests.

Joao Branco from an environmental pressure group, Quercus, showed me the site, pointing out that wolves visited this area as well, along with Bonelli's eagle, black storks and otters. He says they should all be protected.

"I think there will be enough popular protest to stop the construction of the dam," he added.

Already, builders have started blasting a road though the rocky Tua gorge, where the 100m high dam will be erected. The work was suspended after Joao's group found that planning permission had not been granted, yet.

The campaigners are torn between their concern about climate change and their love for the wildlife.

"We should have renewable power but not at any price," Joao says.

Pumped storage

Yet the dams are essential if Portugal's ambitious plans for renewable energy are to be fulfilled, because hydro-electric power is being relied upon to keep the Portuguese grid stable when the wind stops blowing.

While wind turbines are spinning, any excess electricity will be used to pump water from below the dams to the reservoirs at the top. The stored energy can be released to balance the grid at critical times.

Seven of the new dams are designed specifically for pumped storage.

"The combination of wind and water is really the centrepiece of Portugal's energy strategy," explains Manuel Pinho.

He expects that by 2020 the proportion of electricity generated from renewables "will be between 55% and 60%".

At least the creation of reservoirs can have helpful side-effects in a country where water is precious. Driving to the huge dam at Alqueva in the Alentejo you pass grove after grove newly planted olives, all neatly interlaced with irrigation hoses.

Hugely controversial

The dam, opened three years ago, was hugely controversial, but farmers have been taking advantage. Tourist developments are starting and a new airport is planned.

At Alqueva, I asked Antonio Mexia, head of the main electricity company, EDP, about objections to dams.

"Generally environmentalists don't live near the dam," he answered. "The local people tend to be massively in favour."

Meanwhile, Portugal is trying a new way of generating electricity which has no impact on the countryside, but might worry surfers.


Three British-designed Pelamis wave generators are waiting on the quayside in Porto to be towed out to sea. The power produced will be tiny, about the same as a big wind turbine, but it will be the world's first commercial wave farm.

"If you look at the coast and the Atlantic, there's ample opportunity to site wave farms in Portugal," predicts Ian Sharpe, in charge of Portuguese investment for the Australian financial group, Babcock & Brown.


He is responsible for the Pelamis project and is planning to install 500 wave machines off Portugal, if the first attempt is a success.



"We'll run out of suitable locations for wind farms in Portugal, in terms of onshore wind, so we see wave taking over from wind."

Maintenance engineers at Alto Minho have no doubt about what renewable energy means for them.

"Other factories are closing," explains Marco Lajoso who found a job with the German turbine maker, Enercon.

"We have, solar, we have waves, we have wind. That's the future," he adds.

Several thousand jobs have been created in northern Portugal, building and maintaining wind farms. New factories are being set up with state help.

All or nothing

It is a deliberate strategy. Seeing that most equipment might have to be imported and that manufacturers in Germany and Denmark where overwhelmed, the government set about creating a home-grown renewables industry.

To Portuguese politicians, this seemed a dream formula: cure the climate, cut out imports and create jobs. It was all or nothing.

"The cost of inaction is tremendous," Manuel Pinho warns other countries from his office in the elegant centre of Lisbon. "You have to get moving as soon as you can."

The world, and the wolves, will be watching Portugal's progress, to see how well the formula works.

Nick
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Offline Clive

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #46 on: February 22, 2008, 10:33 AM »
Although some of the projects could be applauded, this is yet another case of humanity rushing in to a new venture like headless chickens.... Without thought or long term planning (more than 25 years anyway)....

I see nothing in there about education programmes to reduce power use... Just political claims about reviving an economy and making Portugal famous again....

We need a new topic on the dams of Iberia if someone would like to start one....... Current levels and future plans, protests against and arguments for etc...

Clive
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Offline nick

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #47 on: February 22, 2008, 11:10 AM »
More on this story here

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/working_lunch/7251487.stm

with videos (at least for this weeK)
Nick
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Offline SueMac

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #48 on: February 22, 2008, 11:59 AM »
Actually there is some stuff up  already Clive - I have to remember the keyword - hydification I think. But for this area this is full of information about water resources for Andalucia and Murcia and down to the Alicante province.  The Segura River Basin project is critical:
Some good photos too.
http://www.chsegura.es/chs_en/cuenca/sequias/

and would you believe


http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,435.0.html
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Offline Els Frares

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #49 on: April 25, 2008, 12:03 PM »
Here is a copy of an article that has appeared in today's El Pais, regarding the "massive" death rate of Griffon vultures related to newly opened wind turbine installations. Sorry cannot bring my self to call them "farms"

El fiscal analiza la muerte de buitres junto a parques eólicosMARÍA FABRA - Castellón - 25/04/2008
 
La Fiscalía de Castellón ha abierto diligencias de investigación penal para investigar la denuncia presentada por el Grupo para Estudio y Conservación de los Espacios Naturales (Gecen) sobre la "mortandad masiva de especies estrictamente protegidas" en las comarcas de Els Ports y Alt Maestrat debido, según el colectivo conservacionista, a la instalación de parques eólicos. Cerca de dos centenares de buitres, según los ecologistas, han muerto en estas comarcas porque, al parecer, chocan con las aspas de los aerogeneradores. El cierre de los comederos de aves ha propiciado que éstas viajen buscando vertederos y, en su camino, tropiecen con los molinos. La investigación se realizará ante la posible comisión de un delito contra la flora y fauna, según la fiscalía.
Además, Gecen informó ayer de otras diligencias abiertas tras las denuncias presentadas por presuntos delitos en los parques naturales del Prat de Cabanes-Torreblanca y Sierra de Espadán y en el PAI Sant Gregori de Burriana. Gecen denunció un presunto delito en el Prat de Cabanes-Torreblanca por aterramientos de acequias, vertidos, extracciones y excavaciones; así como un presunto delito en el parque natural Sierra de Espadán por actividad industrial y energía solar. En el PAI Sant Gregori (Burriana), los ecologistas denunciaron un presunto delito por destrucción de zona húmeda y biodiversidad.
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Offline lisa

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #50 on: June 26, 2008, 08:59 AM »
Just found this article about floating wind turbines about to be constructed by the Norweigan state-run oil company.

"Esta gran diferencia con otras instalaciones eólicas 'offshore' resulta muy interesante, ya que una de las mayores limitaciones tecnológicas para levantar hoy en día molinos de viento en el mar es justamente la profundidad de las aguas. Para que sea viable la cimentación de las máquinas, no puede ser mucha la distancia al fondo marino. De hecho, éste constituye uno de los factores que más complica la instalación de turbinas marinas en las costas españolas."

As one of the comments points out, they can't be floating completely free otherwise they'd end up...........where? The Arctic? Anyway, they'd have to be "sujetados" somehow.
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Offline Steve West

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #51 on: June 29, 2008, 13:57 PM »
Here I reproduce an article published in "Catalonia Today", Thursday, June 19, 2008:

From Gibraltar, from Sicily, from the Us, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, and now from Israel, day by day more bad news comes in from the main bird migration flyways of the world. For windfarm developers think nothing of erecting their wind turbines in migration bottlenecks. Wind speed and maximisation of profit is their main concern. Birds are killed by the large blades, whose tips revolve at speeds exceeding 100 mph while deceiving the victims by an appearance of slowness. In Sweden, one wind turbine is reported to have killed 895 birds in one year.

They also get killed by their powerlines, which are built next to each windfarm to carry puny amounts of this very expensive, intermittent electricity to the grid en route to your homes. According to the report "Protecting birds from powerlines", high tension lines may kill over 500 birds per km per year in migration zones. Smaller windfarms may not require high tension lines, but overhead cables are still needed to connect to the distribution network, and they too maim and kill birds that collide in the fog, or at night, or while fleeing some danger. Yet a bird society is actually supporting a large windfarm project on Shetland. Don't they know the island is a crucially important staging post for migrating birds? Until these and many other pertinent questions are answered by the ornithological fraternity we ask all those that cherish Britain's heritage of migratory and other birds ask their favourite bird society why windfarms are allowed in migration corridors, e.g. in the Hebrides or inthe Shetlands? Also ask your electricity suppliers how much of the electricity supplied to your homes comes from wind. Details from BWEA's web site indicate that windfarms only supply 1.5% of Britain's electricity. Then ask yourselves if the slaughter of our birds is really necessary, and join the thousands who are already campaigning against the erection of these wind monsters across Britain.

PROFESSOR DAVID BELLAMY

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Offline lucy

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #52 on: August 27, 2008, 00:18 AM »
An article on the BBC webpage reports that wind farms harm bats even more than birds:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7581990.stm

Offline elmussol

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #53 on: August 27, 2008, 01:01 AM »
Here I reproduce an article published in "Catalonia Today", Thursday, June 19, 2008:

[content snipped]

PROFESSOR DAVID BELLAMY

Alarm bells ring in my head whenever he's quoted, this is just the first I found on Google: If David Bellamy's an environmentalist, I'm a nuclear physicist.

pault
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Offline nick

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #54 on: February 10, 2009, 00:04 AM »
From The Guardian http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/feb/09/windpower-spain

Quote
Spain's investment in renewables is paying dividends for distributors whose costs have plunged this year as winds buffet the country

Giles Tremlett
guardian.co.uk, Monday 9 February 2009 18.07 GMT
 
Spain is world's third largest producer of wind power, behind only the US and Germany Photograph: Murdo Macleod

Wild weather across southern Europe this week is expected to produce a record amount of renewable electricity. As Spaniards were today warned to batten down windows in order to fend off fierce Atlantic gales, the country's electricity distributors were anticipating a windfall – a huge boost in power generation from the country's wind farms.

Spain has built so many wind farms in recent years that the arrival of high winds and the subsequent surge of electricity into the national grid now has an immediate impact on the price at which it is sold.

The country's meteorological office today put parts of the country, especially the north-west region of Galicia, on the second highest warning level for extreme winds. It predicted gusts of up to 120km per hour.

Prices being paid for electricity on the spot market, meanwhile, are reported to have dropped by 11% as production looks set to increase relative to demand. Spanish energy companies are obliged to buy electricity produced from renewable sources before they turn to other sources such as coal, oil or nuclear plants.

"When there is a lot of wind there is normally a drop in price," said a spokesman at Aeolis, a Dutch company that makes wind predictions for European countries. "Other producers will lower their prices if they see more input from wind because they don't want to shut down and cannot slow down their production so easily."

The current record for overall electricity production from wind in Spain was set on January 22 this year. Generation then reached 11,159MW , accounting for 26% of early evening demand. The Bloomberg news agency last week calculated wind speeds in Spain were expected to reach 29% higher this week than they were on January 22.

Any further increase in wind speed, however, may lead to a lowering in production as turbines are programmed to switch themselves off when gusts are high enough to damage them.

Spain added another 11% to its wind-power capacity last year. That increase contributed to a year in which wind power accounted for 43% of new generation capacity – more new electricity capacity in Europe than any other source.

Spain finished the year with 16,740 MW of installed wind capacity, second only to the United States and Germany.

The lower prices paid by Spanish electricity distributors when wind farms are operating at their best are not passed directly on to consumers – most of whom pay a fixed rate.
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Offline Technopat

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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #55 on: March 26, 2009, 14:13 PM »
Greetings All,
This posting is a non-Ib.-Pen.-specific general topic which should probably go elsewhere, but as this thread already exists, 'ere goes:

Quote
RSPB calls for more UK wind farms

There should be a significant increase in the number of wind farms built onshore in the UK, the RSPB has said.

Among the soundbites:
 "This report shows that if we get it right, the UK can produce huge amounts of clean energy without time-consuming conflicts and harm to our wildlife. "Get it wrong and people may reject wind power. That would be disastrous." Ruth Davis, head of climate change policy at the RSPB.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7959912.stm

Dithering-and-in-fighting-(a-speciality-of-many-progressive-thinking-forward-looking-folks)-only-leads-to-extreme-measures-and-in-the-meantime... regs.,
Technopat
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Re: Wind farms and effects on birdlife
« Reply #55 on: March 26, 2009, 14:13 PM »