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piorno - piornales

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Offline Technopat

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« on: February 21, 2007, 15:00 PM »
Greetings,
Am involved in a discussion about piornos (Cytisus - to which the broom belongs. The piornales are extensive areas of these plants mainly growing above the tree-line throughout southern Europe and especially Spain.
My question is: do they grow in clumps, hummocks, mounds, shrubs, and so on? (Clue - in Spanish de porte almohadillado - which is very descriptive but not much help to me).
Would greatly appreciate feedback on this and any other relevant detail.
Thanx,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline nick

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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2007, 17:02 PM »
mmm...broom can of course grow quite tall but "de porte almohadillado" sounds like a mass of low lying hummocks. I've seen this one before.
Stands of low-lying broom hummocks? A bit of mouthful.

Any better answers?

This is the sort of thing we are talking about:

Nick
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Offline Dave

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« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2007, 17:31 PM »
According to my Gardening book, members of the broom family ( Cytisus), are referred to as low lying deciduous shrubs,
even the taller ones, one description I have heard of low lying hummocks, used in garden terms, are cloud hedges,
which usually consist of lots of different clump forming shrubs, such as the cytisus, hebes etc. grown together to look like clouds.
Clump forming shrubs also usually grow from a single root. Whether any of this is of any help whatsoever I do not know
Regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2007, 18:40 PM »
Many thanx! So, how about something along the following lines:
...Cytisus (broom-like shrubs) growing in low-lying clumps in large areas above the tree-line...?

Too optimistic?
Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline CDDI

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« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2007, 12:06 PM »
The use of the word porte defines the shape/density etc of the folgiage. Could not the addition of almohadillado be describing the shrub as bushy or pillowy in aspect?

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2007, 12:21 PM »
Am tempted just to use "soft and fluffy" and run!
Regards,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Dave

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« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2007, 13:24 PM »
if you have ever walked through Broom in shorts, I think 'soft and fluffy' might be the last description you would use
Regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2007, 01:28 AM »
It was all that pillowy talk that brought out the poet in me, and yes, I'm the guiri that goes hiking in long trousers, thick socks and boots come rain or shine - even in mid-July/August - don't want any creepy-crawly, martens foina and the like running up me pins!
Cheers!
Technopat
« Last Edit: August 29, 2007, 23:44 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Sue

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« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2007, 21:01 PM »
Hi Technopat,

Definitely not soft and fluffy, nor cloud, nor pillow like in our area of the Grazalema mountains!

A better description for those growing above the tree line is “The Hedgehog Zone”……as the plants are generally low, rounded, compact and spiny, like said creature.

The exposure to the elements, ie heat, wind and cold are less damaging to the needle like, dense greenery, of course this also deters grazing animals.

Piorno azul, “Erinacea anthyllis”, Hedgehog broom is the perfect example…and note the name! ( also Piorno de crucecitas, Vella spinosa)

Hope that helps some,

Regards Sue
Thinking of visiting the beautiful Sierra de Grazalema in Andalucia?
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2007, 02:12 AM »
Greetings,
"The Hedgehog Zone" is a great name - definitely incorporating it into my hiking jargon. I always knew I was right to wear those long trousers - what was it the man said about the quills upon the fretful porcupine?
Many thanx,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266