Iberianature Forum

Iberian geography, history, geology, environment and climate => Nature and language => Topic started by: Technopat on May 19, 2007, 01:03 AM

Title: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 19, 2007, 01:03 AM
Greetings All,
Suddenly discovered earlier today that I had no idea what to call a person who is an expert on snails, apart from the all-too-obvious "snail expert" ;D, and was further shocked :o to discover that there are many other such words that I desconozco in both English and Spanish. So maybe we could build up a list of such stuff based on the person, the activity and the scientific name (?) - long-term project, and whenever we happen to come across a new one - and when we have more content, try to put some kind of (alphabetical?) order to it ???.

So, to set the ball rolling >:D:

cazador - la caza - cinegética
cetrero - cetrerí­a
veterinario - veterinaria

Regs.
Technopat

Ps.
And, of course, any of the other languages used on the Ib. Pen.

Pps.
The original title for this thread was Nature-related jobs, professions, activities, branches of science and people (in Spanish), but due to the lack of foresight of the forum developers and/or server designers, it didn't fit. Pity, 'cos it had a nice succinct descriptiveness to it  ;D.
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 21, 2007, 16:50 PM
Greetings All,
Just two a day each? :-\

apicultor - apicultura
entomólogo - entomologí­a

Regs,
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: lisa on May 21, 2007, 22:59 PM

mamiferólogo - mamiferología
ornitólogo - ornitología

 ;D ;D
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 22, 2007, 15:31 PM
Greetings Lisa,
I'll see yours 'n' double it! (Sounds good, great line from the films - not sure if it fits :-\)

ecólogo/a and/or ecologista - ecologí­a
paleontólogo/a - paleontologí­a
botánico (/a?) - botánica
zoólogo/a - zoologí­a

Regs.
Technopat

Ps.
The alph. order is not yet a priority, is it? >:D

Pps.
I'd like to put in a request for the Sp. (and Eng.!) term for bat expert.

Pps.
Still waiting for that snail expert (in Sp. and Eng.)  >:D >:D

PPPs.
Can someone help me out with a doubt: does that smiley with its tongue sticking out mean "tricky" as in "That's a tricky one!" or "knackered" as in "That was difficult!"?

Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Clive on May 22, 2007, 16:17 PM
Hola,

Working on the theory that a snail farmer is a snail expert and being glad that Roxanne is still in the grey island to the north and also that she had to put her snails back into the wild because her mum wanted the washing basket back.....

es  helicicultura

Here's the word being used at http://www.uco.es/organiza/servicios/publica/az/php/az.php?idioma=0&revista=67&codigo=921

en  heliciculture

And the usual in depth study Wikipedia link at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heliciculture

Clive
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 22, 2007, 22:34 PM
Greetings Clive and All,

Right, so we get heliciculturista or helicicultor/a (heliciculturist ??? ) - helicicultura. :-\ :-\ :-\

As for the in depth wiki-article (nominated as an example of how well-written articles for wikipedia can be), just love the following statement:

"Snail egg has 12 to 20 times the protein of salad.", which is where I stopped reading.

Regs.
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: nick on May 22, 2007, 22:59 PM
Then we have the butterfly people:

lepidopterist (en)

lepidopterólogo (esp) - try pronouncing drunk
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: lisa on May 22, 2007, 23:06 PM
bat expert - Eng. chiroptologist, Sp. chiroptologo/quiropterista  ???


and I'm only doing one cos TP did 4  >:(

For Nick - drunk  ;D
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: nick on May 22, 2007, 23:08 PM
And more:

ornithologist - ornitólogo
birder - pajarero

fish
ichthyologist-  ictiólogo
insects
entomologist - entomólogo
shrooms
mycologist - micólogo
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Clive on May 22, 2007, 23:11 PM
Hola,

That snail link is very good indeed.....And I quite like the bit about making escargot (but don't tell Roxanne)...

Ok everybody over to the creepy crawlies board....There is an extinct moth that needs identifying...

Clive
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: nick on May 22, 2007, 23:41 PM
Oh dear. Just seen your "just two each a day rule", Technopat

Oh well

Guardia forestal
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 22, 2007, 23:45 PM
Greetings All,
Great stuff!
You see, folks, all that was needed was a bit of the right spirit (sporting - not alcoholic) to get things going.
I was going to up the ante, but it's clear that at this rate we'll have an amazingly extensive list in no time!

Regs.
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 22, 2007, 23:49 PM
Greetings Nick and All,
The just-two-a-day crack was meant in a teasing/pleading tone, as in "Isn't anyone capable of coming up with even two a day?" >:D >:D
The more the merrier!
Regs.
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Clive on May 22, 2007, 23:58 PM
Hola,

What the Spanish phrase for "overuse of the devil smilie"???

maybe it should be confiscated from technopat?

 ;D

Clive
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 23, 2007, 00:03 AM
 :-*
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: lisa on May 23, 2007, 09:34 AM
Here are a few more then;

bacteriología - bacteriólogo

ecología - ecologista

ethología - ethologista (animal behaviour)

oceanografía - oceanógrafo

pedología - pedologista (soil, not to be confused with children or breaking wind)

orología - orólogo/orologista?? (mountains)

acarología - acarólogo (ticks and mites  :o)

Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 23, 2007, 10:24 AM
Greetings Lisa,
Your cool inclusion of acarologí­a is the perfect cue - nit-picking  ;D - for me to point out, while we're still on the pre-draft version, that the "th" combination is uncommon in Spanish and the Konrad Lorenz, although actually a zoologist, animal psychologist (Sp., anyone?) and ornithologist, is most often referred to as an etólogo, as in in etologí­a.

While we're on this sub-section - ethnobotanist, anybody?

Don't doubt you'll get your own back on me some day! >:D

Kind regs.
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: lisa on May 23, 2007, 10:48 AM
The nearest I can get to snails is;

Eng. malacology (study of molluscs)
Sp. malacología - malacólogo

http://elrincondelmalacologo.iespana.es/ (http://elrincondelmalacologo.iespana.es/)

Must go and do something useful guesthouse-wise.  ::)
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 23, 2007, 13:37 PM
Greetings All,
It's snippets like Lisa's above that help to make this iberianature forum one of the best and most exciting discoveries I've come across in years. Every day brings a new titbit (tidbit to you Yanks out there  ;)) to enjoy - I've learnt more here over the last few months than in years.

From malacologí­a we get to the subdivision conquiologí­a and conquiólogo.

The following link takes us to the Sociedad Española de Malacalogí­a:
http://www.sesm.es/ (http://www.sesm.es/)

Many thanx, Lisa :)
Warm regs.
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on May 23, 2007, 22:23 PM
Greetings All,

taxónomo/ma and/or taxonomista - taxonomí­a

Interesting chorrada has just cropped up re. Nick's Guardia forestal - all the official sources (BOE and regional gov. web sites) I've checked on Gooooooogle say Guarda  - the only references to guardia are the schools that prepare the public examinations. The DRAE is, of course, useless.

Also Agente forestal and Guarda rural

Regs.
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on October 27, 2007, 01:03 AM
Greetings All,
A link kindly provided by Iñigo gave me the following cool addition to this great thread:
mirmecólogo/ga - mirmecología (En. myrmecologist and myrmecology)  as in ant experts :dancing:
Regs.,
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: iñigo on October 29, 2007, 10:07 AM
Hi,

Technopat I do not know if it was anotherr despiste due to my bad English but the correct word is : mirmecólogo/a.

Another words mentioned before are:

Malacólogo/a: They study all the mollusc. The Conquiologos study only their shells.

Mastozoologo/a: study the mammals.

Guarda forestal: They are now called Agente forestal or Agente de Medio Ambiente in many Spanish comunities. (Guardia is a different word, like Guardia civil).

Etnobotánico/a: They study the uses of the plants.

Edafólogo/a: Study the soil.

Quiropterólogo/a: Study the bats.

And finally be carefull with the words ecologista and ecologo, because they are seldom bad translated into Spanish. The ecologo/a is the persom who study ecology whereas the ecologista is the man or the woman concerned about the environment but they are not scientist (How do you call them, ambientalist?). All the ecologos should be ecologistas but some of them hate to be named like this.

Regards,


Iñigo
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: nick on October 29, 2007, 10:26 AM
Good point on the ecologista and ecologo.

There's no distinction in English betwen the scientist and the activist, which is a shame.

Environmentalist is the other word
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on October 29, 2007, 11:16 AM
Greetings Iñigo,
Touché! as we polyglots say :dancing:
Will rush off and correct it immediately
Regs.,
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on November 30, 2007, 23:10 PM
Greetings All,
In my ongoing battle of wits to try and educate y'all  :dancing: (aka getting my own back on those of you who put me to shame for not knowing nuffin' 'bout nature  :technodevil:), I was delighted to come across the following term today, courtesy of Wikipedia:
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limnolog%C3%ADa (http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limnolog%C3%ADa)
from whence we get limnólogo/a and limnología

or, if you don't feel up to the Sp. version, here's the En. one:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limnology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limnology)

But, for once, the Sp. version is far more complete and makes interestinger  :santa_grin: reading.

Regs.,
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: lisa on December 01, 2007, 08:54 AM
Good to see more proof of Darwin going out on a limn limb again.
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Simon on December 29, 2007, 16:25 PM
Hi Guys and Gals,

I've just found this thread, typical of me I know but I've now ordered broadband - 40 days to wait!!!

Anyway, it's too obvious really the enthusiasts or experts in snails are gastropodiatrists of course! Tee hee!

Simes
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on January 03, 2008, 03:25 AM
Greetings All,
Whereas Simon's latest brings us back nicely to my initial query at the beginning of this interesting thread, and

Whereas gastropod is clearly the class name for what Clive elsewhere terms a creepy-crawly - but let it pass - there's something 'bout that
Quote
Tee hee!
that worries the hell out of me and makes me suspect that someone - no names - is pulling our collective legs (Sp. anyone?).

Or is it that so many months - not yet a full year - as an iberianatureforumer has made Technopat somewhat more jaded - as in cynical - than before ...

We all know that Simon is not beyond the odd (as in occasional) jolly jape and wordplay*, so Technopat would appreciate a third-party, unbiased second opinion on this latest addition to our list - the prestige of iberiantureforum is at stake, folks!

*the Spanish term gastropediatra (En. anyone?) springs readily to mind

Concerned regs.,
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Dave on January 03, 2008, 10:22 AM
Hi TP and All
Pulling someones leg in Spanish is Tomar el Pelo ( translates as pull the Hair but means the same thing), apparently according to my family in Spain, the English are better at it than the Spanish along with el sarcasmo.
Regards
Dave
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on January 03, 2008, 13:18 PM
Greetings Dave and All,
Dave got it - 'cos this time he obviously wasn't relying on 'is Collins!  :technodevil:
I would agree, in general terms, that sarcasm/irony/leg pulling, etc. do seem to have been raised to an art form back in the LOG, but it's something that has always surprised me as they have appropriated the cara de póquer from the En. term when it would seem that the game of mus dates back much further than poker, and to a non-card player, it would seem that these two games are similar in many ways - i.e. based (?) on bluffing*. Could it be that mus, being of Basque origin (originally French), suffers from some sort of linguistic/sociocultural discrimination in the rest of the country? I do know of some mus players and they do tend to be Basques. Any regional feedback? Any poker AND mus players out there among you iberianatureforumers?

*The DRAE gives the following for

Quote
farol
4.  m. Hecho o dicho jactancioso que carece de fundamento. Marcarse, tirarse un farol.

5. m. En el juego, envite falso hecho para desorientar o atemorizar.
Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

Off-on-one-of-me-tangents-again-with-the-aim-of-raising-fellow-and-fellowess-Ib.-Pen.-residing-iberianatureforumers'-sociocultural -awareness regs.,
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Dave on January 03, 2008, 13:52 PM
Hi TP
Yes, in Leon we have regular mus tournaments and they are taken very seriously, in fact in several of the tercero edad , I love that description,day centres nearly every table is taken up with mus players, not sure about poker, I will ask my cuñeado.
Regards
Dave
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on January 03, 2008, 14:17 PM
Greetings Dave,
Yes, that tercera edad is a goody - often thought about it and its origins but never quite sure - by my reckoning, according to Shakespeare's SEVEN ages of Man, the 3rd age would be the lover ...

Any ideas, folks?
In-the-prime-of-life regs.,
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: John C on January 03, 2008, 17:55 PM
What is Spanish for "twitcher"?   Just in case you don't know this is slang for a birdwatcher who races everywhere to see odd waifs and strays.  Lately confused in the UK press with anyone who watches birds.   I think the word has been taken up by other nationalities so there may be Spainish version of it.   If not, I'm tempted to suggest "tonto-ista"!

John
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: lisa on January 05, 2008, 17:46 PM
According to an ornitólogo friend - bimbero...and the rarity - bimbo  :santa_lipsrsealed:
I won't mention the temporary suppression methods of bodily functions  :santa_shocked:
 
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Simon on January 10, 2008, 08:45 AM
Ha!

There was nothing to worry about with my 'Tee Hee' Teeps, unless you are pompous about job titles (a trait that has no plac on this 'ere egalitarian forum!)

I thought that Bimbo was bread, or rather a  crumbly white substance that disintegrates when toasted ad buttered! It went along with Bonka coffee and the joke products of our early years here! Mind you, if you want a pack of Durex in Australia you'll have to go to a stationer's shop!

More word tricks soon I hope!

Regs

Simon
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on January 11, 2008, 11:41 AM
Greetings All,
John C, the twitcher is a good one! I think tontólogo might slide off the tongue (as opposed to slip of the t.) easier.

Far from being
Quote
pompous about job titles (a trait that has no plac on this 'ere egalitarian forum!)
-. though I admit to being a snob in other matters  :dancing: I like to call spades spades (Sp. anyone?), and was delighted the other day to come across - I think in Nick's interesting article on the European desert - the term phytosociologist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytosociology) which, if I could live my life again, would definitely be my calling  :dancing:

"For of all sad words of tongue or pen, the saddest are these: 'It might have been! ..." (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Greenleaf_Whittier)

Or, for those of us with little time on our hands: If only ... (Sp. anyone?)

Regs.-as-in-regards-not-regrets regs.,
Technopat
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Technopat on January 11, 2008, 14:21 PM
PS.
Not sure which of the guy's two surnames I'd rather have ... :dancing:
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Clive on January 11, 2008, 14:44 PM
New word...

smilologista/o

A person who uses too many smilies.... :)
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Dave on January 11, 2008, 17:03 PM
Hi All
How about Honkologist, for overuse of the horn, a Spanish trademark
Regards
Dave
Title: Re: Nature and people (in Spanish)
Post by: Simon on January 12, 2008, 06:11 AM
Dave, that's 'klaxonero' isn't it! I would put down a 'honologo' as an expert in smells (of the disgusting Iberianaiture jokkie obsessive type!)

Simes