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high/low cholesterol foods list in Spanish needed

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Offline Clive

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« on: November 25, 2007, 19:47 PM »
Hi all,

This is not iberianature related but maybe it is... Maybe I should have posted this in tapas and tipples.. time will tell....

I have a friend who has to watch his cholesterol levels and also sugar intake.. (It really is a friend, its not me :) )

Anyway, can anyone find him a table of data in Spanish that lists food types and also weights of portions showing the cholesterol weight as well... I can find them in English but it has to be in Spanish so he can show his wife that he is allowed to eat fruit! (long story)

Sample diet sheets or any advice welcome... Anyone got cholesterol?

Clive
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Offline SueMac

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« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2007, 20:58 PM »
Unfortunately I have had high cholestrol all my life and have various treatments including statins which have not made me feel well enough to keep taking them given some of my other MS symptoms. But now I am on large doses of omega 3 tablets - pretty straightforward really.  However food  and cholestrol education important and here is my Spanish one attached.  Please note shell fish very very high...
SueMac
SueMac

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Offline glennie

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« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2007, 21:21 PM »
SueMac, I guess you have heard about the cholesterol-reducing properties of oats (porridge) and walnuts.
Anyway, thought I'd mention it ...  :-*

Related website:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cholesterol/CL00002

« Last Edit: November 25, 2007, 21:25 PM by glennie »

Offline tonyninfas

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« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2007, 22:47 PM »
Sounds like you friend is like me - diabetico. 
I find it a real drag that shellfish is high in cholesterol, but can allow myself the occasional treat, as long as it is not overdone.  However what really hurts is that the alcohol consumption also has to be watched, and I do like my vino tinto.  Fruit and vegetables are a mainstay of my diet nowadays because of the natural sugar content allowing for a slower intake into the system, rather than quickly absorbed refined variety.  So it is salad for lunch, and fresh fruit for dessert after the evening meal.  Out goes the cream and only a modicum of low fat cheese, but plenty of oily fish (which has always been a favourite, so no problems there).  As with all things moderation is the word and even a diabetic can get away with the odd sin.  And - I prefer to control it by diet rather than have to take insulin. 
What amazes me are the number of diabetics who because they use insulin believe that it is not therefore necessary to watch their diet and immediately take it as a carte blanche to stuff themselves full of chocolate etc - result - gigantic heat attack.  I have watched this happen to friends on more than one occasion 
I do find that Spain caters more in the supermarkets for diabetics with plenty of sugar-free products on the shelves, which are not so grossly over-priced as in the LOG.  I do like a nice little slice of sugar-free turron at Christmas time !!
Finally, if these requirements regarding his diet are from the medico, I find it odd that the infermeria has not asked his wife to go in to see her with him, so that she can be instructed in the necessary changes.  Perhaps, he should ask her to accompany him next time he goes, so that it can all be explained to her.  ::)

Offline Clive

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« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2007, 23:17 PM »
Thanks for the replies...

Suemac that image is exactly what I am after... Thank you.... Is it from a web site i can get more info from?

Oats and walnuts Glennie, yes I talked about that today with our friend....

He's not diabetic Tony but there is a sugar and salt thing going on as well... Actually, one problem is his wife who has told him he can't eat fruit because there is too much sugar in it but he can eat as much cheese as he likes! At the doctors she told the nutritionist that she knew all the correct things he should eat and today when he told us this it was like.... You can't eat fruit? but you can eat cheese?.... hmmmm

So he asked us to find out for him so he has something that he can learn himself... The pictionary image from SueMac is going to help a lot.... need more stuff like that please :)

Thanks all

Clive

Explore the nature of Iberia at www.wildsideholidays.com

The beautiful town of Ronda, the City of Dreams?

The spectacular Caminito del Rey, El Chorro and Guadalhorce reservoirs El Camino del Rey

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2007, 23:55 PM »
Greetings Clive,
Both SueMac and Tony both speak highly of the importance of diet. It's something I've been wanting to broach SueMac on and never get round to doing.: can we set up a Mediterranean diet board? Something that's always fascinated me here in Spain: how everyone speaks of the wonders of hte Mediterranean diet and how healthy it is and then they go and stuff themselves with chorizo and high cholesterol foodstuffs, etc. which have nothing to do with the Med diet.

Yer friend's wife sounds EXACTLY like Technopat's mother-in-law, who although her husband has now had eight nasty episodes (including two Xmas eves spent in intensive care) of high blood pressure and has been forbidden salt & shellfish & cheese & chorizo & (amongst many other things), continues serving him two fried eggs at night - you can actually see the salt on top like frosting on a cake - claiming that she doesn't have what it takes to prevent him from eating such things when it gives him such pleasure and he's always done it (¿cómo no vamos a cenar gambas en Noche Buena? and ¿cómo no voy a echar sal en las lentejas?) and coffee without three heaped spoonfuls of sugar is undrinkable and ...

It makes no difference whatsoever how much the doctors, nurses, sons and daughters warn her (her favourite son-in-law gave up many years ago) of the consequences. She just sits in the hospital waiting room wailing and beating her breast. If on top of that he smoked and/or drank ... My theory as to why he still hasn't kicked the bucket (Sp. anyone?) yet is that he eats vast amounts of fruit every day - far more than the minimum of 3 portions Technopat eats - and it must help neutralise the salt, cholesterol and all. And my theory as to why the mother-in-law ... >:D

Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline spanishfreelander

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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2007, 07:46 AM »
Hi all,
I have to watch the cholesterol level as well..for years and years it was very low in the uk....the doctor said it was helpful to use olive oil for most of the cooking,which i had been doing since our first trip to spain 15 years ago.
We both take omega 3 capsules every night,but found that Carrefour dosnt seem to have much in the way of Vitamin supplements,so its off to Mercadona who do have a lot on the shelves.
Dave

Offline SueMac

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« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2007, 10:27 AM »
Hi all

I hadnt realised that there was such an interest out there - I have a list that I will attach to the  post which is in spanish and on the reverse of the pictorial (given to me by my Spanish GP).  As TP points out the issues are not straightforward and genetics play a part but must not be an excuse.  Just not fair - Steve has very very low cholestrol, smokes, drinks eats cheese like theres no tomorrow, potato chip has beena staple for him all his adult life.  Doesnt like fruit............

The Spanish diet does run the gamut of extremes - watching the big boxes coming out of the patisserie and in my case buying turron for an English guest to try who has a polite nibble goes home and leaves the rest for me.!

First of all Glennie I have been eating muesli for many years - I usually buy a basic pack which is quite easy to get here in the supermarkets and Puerto Lumbreras now has a specialish eco meat, veg, and vegetarian shop with many products sin sal etc. I thin add my own ingredients. fresh fruit nuts etc.   In UK employees due for a medical were renouned for eating porridge for about a fortnight before medical because of its propensity to strip  out cholestrol....

Secondly I gave up smoking after 40 years at a stroke because of my diagnosis and my mother's second heart attack.  I
dont take sugar in any drink. I have withdrawn from as many wheat products as I possibly can for MS reasons but I notice an increase in my bread consumption  and the occasional biscotccia  (sorry cant remember how to spell)from my fav bakery since I came to PL.  I always use poly unsaturated products (worth remembering that olive oil is no longer"good" when at smoking hot temperature. Puddings are occasional although this is a hardship having grown up in a world where I was given the opportunity to show off that I was "good on puds" . 

It is extremely hard to watch all the labels of the tinned food products and  also trying to explain why I ask my british friends not to give me food drowned in preprepared sauces.  I do have a problem here fnding plain yogurts without sugar .  Dont eat UK type candy  full of processed sugar but insist on Black and Green 70% choc being in the larder against the day I do feel like a small piece (this is not tongue in cheek as a small piece goes a very long way)

Cheese is my downfall - have been very good and removed myself off cow products but have developed a serious interest in trying all the goats cheeses I can lay my hands on. I keep hoping that I have now been in Spain sufficiently long to give this excuse up. Ditto oives in salt solution.  I also know that my consumption of eggs has increased since coming to Spain. Should be no more than two a week????
I use the plentiful pomegranates  on our space and juice them despite making a terrible mess in the process. Cant understand why the Spanish dont do this yet. It is soo good for you. 

The trouble is doing the right thing and then spoiling it by cooking it the wrong way ie frying oily fish and adding lots of coarse salt as TP points out. 

I feel pretty cross at the rabbits for depriving me of all the greens I tried to grow this last year - our plan is to fence off a rabbit proof area for the coming year.  In the meantime I always buy at market , not supermarket although I cant guarantee whether it is organically grown.
Red wine  (2 glasses) is good in moderation apparently for the over 50's.  Try tellling that to your Spanish friends. One wicked tip from my cousin which makes good use of Spanish products and can brighten up the plainest of salads etc is chilli sherry.  Maybe I am teaching my grandmother to suck eggs here but just in case..... dry sherry which I put in one of my loveliest decanters and red chillies pushed into it and allowed to permeate.

My mum was recently diagnosed with type II diabetes  so it was suggested I should ask my Spanish GP to check. Following visit he said "Perfecto".  Music to my ears.
SueMac








SueMac

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Offline glennie

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« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2007, 12:44 PM »
   In UK employees due for a medical were renouned for eating porridge for about a fortnight before medical because of its propensity to strip  out cholestrol....

Not sure I understand this. Guess you mean they were trying to deceive docs about their normal eating habits.

Isn't it actually supposed to be better when cooked? I mean it tends to produce a sticky substance then which, if I'm right, is what does all the good.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2007, 12:46 PM by glennie »

Offline SueMac

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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2007, 14:43 PM »

Hi Glennie
Yes it is supposed to fool the doctors :noidea:
SueMac


ps Can only eat porridge when temperature has plummeted so muesli   has to do most of the time here.
SueMac

Now mainly blogging on www.suevista.blogspot.com Vistas from Afar - A European Garden Blog