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The Great Iberian Shroom Identification Competition!

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Offline Clive

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« on: March 14, 2007, 15:31 PM »
Hola,

Sorry I have been a little lax and keep posting silly plants to identify or tiny bugs of no consequence...

So here is my Shroom Identification Competition (Just for fun of course)

Redshroom, orangeshroom and whiteshroom have been sitting in my unidentified folder for long enough so we need the answers to these questions

1. what is it's name in Spanish, Scientific and English?
2. Is it edible by humans if not what happens to you if you eat it!
3. What does eat it?

There you go that should keep the shrooming people happy for a bit browsing through their fungus archives and having happy memories of tastes past!

Clive
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Offline Dave

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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2007, 16:38 PM »
Dear All
right
The first one is possibly Russula rubra - no Spanish or English name  inedible, rare, diameter 7-8 cm - source the Bloobook
Regards
Dave

Offline Clive

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« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2007, 16:52 PM »
Hola Dave,

When you say "inedible" do you mean it tastes yuk or that it will kill you at five paces?

Clive
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Offline Dave

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« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2007, 17:07 PM »
dear All
The second one possibly Lactarius aurantiacus - not for eating, English name Orange milkcap source - Bloobook

The word inedible means I think- not for eating, I do not think it is actually poisonous, we'll let Technopat try one
regards
Dave

Offline Dave

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« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2007, 17:36 PM »
Dear all
Finally the 3rd one I think  - Agaricus benesii - Edible - one of the mushrooms - source the Bloobook

Regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2007, 01:40 AM »
Greetings Clive, Dave and All,
Now we're cookin'!
Here is my prelim. version. Haven't yet been able to double-check or look for Sp. names.
As for the question: What does eat it? Not something I've ever thought about and bears following up.

Agree with Dave about Redshroom being Russula, but reckon it's R. emetica - the sickener or vomiting russula - inedible (as so often is the case, the Latin name is descriptive) but not poisonous.

Without seeing the stem etc. cannot identify it further - of the thousands of Russula, over a hundred of 'em have that red cap (pileus). It's also the typical 'shroom that some (weirdo) people love to smash to pieces as it is very brittle! (Maybe there's some innate subconscious reaction going on deep inside their lizard brain from the time our ancestors were unable to check stuff on internet and they found things out by trial 'n' error).

Orangeshroom a.k.a. Lactarius mitissimus (very mild) is edible, though bitter, and best boiled. (Again, without seeing the stem, etc...)

As for Whiteshroom, while the photo is excellent - the 'shroom spotter/hunter's dream - as it shows just about every feature (except relative size - where's that lighter/coin as a reference?), I'm taking a leaf out of Linnaeus' book regarding any fungi business and being cautious in my pronouncement.

I agree with Dave that it's Agaricus. Tempted to think that it's an extremely healthy and photogenic A. campestris a.k.a. field mushroom whose stem can grow to 7 cms, so if it's a life-size photo ... but that's not my last word ...

Thanx for the pix.
Regards from a very happy
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline lisa

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« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2007, 07:50 AM »
Hello everybody, I think no.3 is a parasol mushroom Macrolepiota procera or parasol sombrero. See this link http://www.mushroomexpert.com/macrolepiota_procera.html. They have dry, scaly tops (or whatever the scientific term is) and the ring on the stem can slide up and down. We've eaten lots and they can get pretty big. Grow in fields near pines. What do you reckon?
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2007, 12:39 PM »
Greetings Lisa and All,
Agree that it looks very similar to your parasol, but as the excellent link you provided suggests on another, internal link http://www.mushroomexpert.com/chlorophyllum_molybdites.html, it could just as easily be - 'cos I reckon the stem is thicker and whiter in the orig. pic. - and in my h. opinion, is more likely to be, chlorophyllum molybdite, in which case we're definitely to be wary, as it would def. be poisonous and commonly causes problems as it grows on lawns and in meadows (the original pic. looks more like it's in a meadow). Sticking to my original ident. of Field Mushroom (general size and also position of ring still worry me, though), so won't start snarfing yet!

Beginning to harbour that funny sneaking suspicion that our 'Shroom Master is one step ahead of us mere mortals, and has intentionally chosen samples that are open to heated debate as to their identification and being edible or inedible and/or poisonous.

Conspiracy theory?

Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Clive

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« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2007, 13:30 PM »
Hola,

Who me?

I can honestly admit I have absolutely no idea what these fungus things are but I have ascertained now that they are inedible, edible, poisonous and downright tricky!

Which is why I stick to button mushrooms for my egg sandwiches.

Clive
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Offline lisa

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« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2007, 15:09 PM »
O.K. but all I can find is that it grows in the U.S.A and sub-tropical regions?
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2007, 15:29 PM »
Do badgers eat mushrooms?
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2007, 15:40 PM »
Clive,
You want to be careful wiv those egg sarnies - salmonella. And if the button 'shrooms are from tins - botulism.
Does anyone know of anybody whose has tried to encourage a particular (wild) mushroom to grow in their back yard. Obviously, to try to cultivate 'em on the windowsill, which I seem to remember was fashionable in the UK years ago, is not what I mean, but if you are lucky enough o have a small copse at the end of your garden, in the middle of your estate, etc.,  ... I see a future of eating chip butties and 'shroom sarnies!

Look forward to hearing of case studies.
Cheers!
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline nick

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« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2007, 17:16 PM »
I've just printed out and eaten copies of all three photos, lightly fried with oil and parsley...and am now starting to feel a little queasy
Nick
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Offline Dave

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« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2007, 17:47 PM »
You should have boiled them first
Regards
Dave

Offline Clive

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« Reply #14 on: March 15, 2007, 20:15 PM »
Hola,

So, before i go and get these guys out of the freezer. Is everybody ABSOLUTELY! sure that they are safe to eat?

It's just that I like the idea of red and orange on a plate with white as the mediator.

Clive
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2007, 00:05 AM »
Whoa there, Clive - hold your horses!
It would take a more foolhardy man than I/me to be ABSOLUTELY certain about ANY mushroom - including loads that look just like button mushrooms at the early stage - Amanita virosa a.k.a. Destroying Angel is one that springs readily to mind (and you all thought A. muscaria was poisonous - no comparison whatsoever - the trip A. virosa will take you on is strictly one way!). And I'm sure I speak for many, if not all, of us on the forum when I say we'd miss your company. And those rooks up in Leon need all the moral support they can get!

It's getting on for midnight now, and on the off-chance that you haven't already snarfed your multicolour dish of 'shrooms, I would just like to ask you to wait until I, or anyone else, can finish off the original remit, which was to identify the item in Sp. Eng. and scientifically; confirm whether it was edible (by humans!), and if not, what would happen to said humans; and finally, what on earth would eat it.

So far no-one has been able to answer your challenge, and I therefore request a moratorium on any snarfing to be done until a satisfactory answer to your reasonable demands has been forthcoming, sometime next year perhaps.

Regs.
Technopat

Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Clive

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« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2007, 17:49 PM »
Hola,

Fear not Technopat,

Last night i was kidnapped and held prisoner until I completed all the technical side of the deposing and reposing of the puppet man. Nice shiny forum now....

So I had no time for my red, orange and white shroom and egg sarnie.

Clive
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Offline Dave

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« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2007, 18:01 PM »
Dear All
All that Glisters is not Gold ( the proper Shakespeare quote )
But it does look very nice
Regards
Dave

Simon

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« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2007, 21:40 PM »
Hello to everyone everywhere. I’m a bit late in attempting the mighty mycology quiz so here goes:

I used two guidebooks in tryng to solve Clive’s conundrums, first, Helmut & Renate Grünert’s , Guías de Naturaleza Blume: Setas. Blume and then, Shelly Evans and Geoffrey Kibby’s, Guías de Boldsillo: Hongos. Ediciones Omega, which looks like it’s one of the Collins pocket guides in the English version. I found that having come up with a solution the Grünerts I found that I could not confirm any of these from Evans and Kibby!

Well, I think this bears out my preference for using a living guide or sticking to the on sale varieties! Perhaps at the Isona (Lleida) mycology fair next October (sorry,Technopat, I've pasted the pictures but they're not coming through on the post). Meanwhile, “Anyone for wild asparagus?”

On to the answers, such as they are:

1) Rúsula emética (Russula emetica) a.k.a. The Sickener or
Rúsula graciosa, (Russula lapida), no English name given
I’d settled on Russula lapida from Grünert but couldn’t find it in Evans & Kibby, from whose description I then preferred Russula emetica. The clincher was Evans & Kibby’s description of the red cap’s surface, which they pointed out is without any blemish or rupture. I don’t know what the ‘emetic’ is but it doesn’t sound like muscaline if the only symptom is vomiting.

2) Lactario anaranjado (Lactarius volemus) a.k.a. Fishy Milkcap
I have to say this is a complete guess as lots of mushrooms in the books could have fitted this image, so perhaps a lesson there when looking at brown ‘shrooms

3) Amanita maliolente (Amanita virosa)   a.k.a. Destroying Angel
The Evans & Kibby description was very clear on this one. They say the pure white gills are the definitive identifier. The poison is definitely phaline, especially from the Spanish name which seems to imply a slow death!

I suspect I get nil puntos for this, but it’s been a lot of fun, especially as it took me to a disused corner of the library, disused until next fall at least! Thanks to Clive for raising the challenge – I’ll be back!

Cheers, Simon

 
 






Offline Technopat

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« Reply #19 on: March 16, 2007, 22:53 PM »
Greetings All,
Dave, I think what Shakespeare meant to say was All that Glisters is not Golf, but as ev'ryone nose, 'e was a lousy speler, as indeed wer moste peeple of 'is day.

And before Simon has the final word on 'shrooming matters, I'd really like to know what other animals, apart from humans, eat mushrooms. Slugs and snails, I'm pretty sure. Flies (as in Fly Agaric?), possibly. Some sort of beetle, maybe.

Be that as it may, Simon's reference to wild asparagus reminded me of a question I had meant to pose some time ago, but amongst other things, was sidetracked by more pressing matters, such as trying to convince Clive not to eat his 'shrooms. Greens, yes. 'Shrooms, no. No, not even the button ones.

However, as this is the funny fungi thread, I will start another one elsewhere (domestic Iberian fauna?) and come back and leave a link here.

Regs.
Technopat

Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266