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Diclofenac,NSAIDS and the threat to Iberian vultures

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Offline lisa

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Offline Clive

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« Reply #61 on: March 15, 2014, 00:52 AM »
Information from Rewilding Europe about the subject...

http://www.rewildingeurope.com/news/articles/all-europe-s-vultures-under-sudden-new-threat/

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All Europe’s vultures under sudden new threat

Rewilding Europe shares the concerns of the Vulture Conservation Foundation and BirdLife International that Eiurope’s vultures are now at extremely high risk. Rewilding Europe supports their efforts for banning veterinary diclofenac in Europe. Both organizations have sent to the EU Commission and the EU member states a formal request for them to start a Referral procedure for a withdrawal of marketing authorization of veterinary diclofenac under Article 35 of Directive 2001/82/EC, based on its risks for vulture populations in Europe.

What a disaster!
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Offline Clive

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« Reply #62 on: March 16, 2014, 11:06 AM »
An excellent BBC article on the background of diclofenac use in India and the current situation...

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-25963100

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After the devastation wrought by a drug on Asian vulture populations, a project hopes to begin releasing captive-bred birds into the wild by 2016.

The Saving Asia's Vultures from Extinction (Save) programme says it plans to release up to 25 birds into a 30,000-sq-km drug-free "safe zone".

Diclofenac - used by vets on cattle - was identified as causing a crash in vulture numbers and banned by India.

But, says Save, the version for human use is still given illegally to cattle.

Diclofenac was banned for use by vets and farmers in 2006 because of its effect on vultures that feed on livestock carcasses.

The link between the anti-inflammatory drug, used to reduce swelling in injured or diseased animals, and the devastating demise of Asia's vulture populations was firmly established in 2004.
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Offline StripeyCat

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« Reply #63 on: March 22, 2014, 19:25 PM »
I don't know what impact this will have, if any, but Diclofenac is being withdrawn from the UK [I know because a friend of mine has just been taken off it]. It has been linked to cardiovascular complications. In Feb' 2013 Dr Patricia McGettigan, from Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, pointed out that the drug "has no advantage in terms of gastrointestinal safety and it has a clear cardiovascular disadvantage". She concluded: "There are strong arguments to revoke its marketing authorisations globally." - See more at: http://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/news/general-news/2013/february/experts-call-for-diclofenac-to-be-withdrawn-due-to-heart-risks.aspx#sthash.Lc86iKfd.dpuf

People are now being switched from diclofenac to safer alternatives, I hope that this will also filter through to its use in animals, and if the post saying it has already been withdrawn from veterinary use is true, then hopefully it won't be too long before it vanishes.

Offline Clive

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« Reply #64 on: March 25, 2014, 10:32 AM »
Interesting information from the RSPB on the subject of diclofenac......

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From: "Meyer, Danielle" <Danielle.Meyer@rspb.org.uk>
Subject: RE: Diclofenac threat to Iberian Vultures
Date: 20 March 2014 16:36:17 CET

Hello Paula,
 
Thank you for contacting the RSPB regarding your concerns with the use of diclofenac in Europe and North Africa.
 
As you are aware from your reading, the RSPB and our birdlife partners are continually researching this topic. The introduction of the use of diclofenac in Italy and Spain was devastating for us, as there is so much evidence about the harmful consequences of these drugs on vulture species. Furthermore, meloxicam, another non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is available for use in cattle and swine, with evidence that is cause little to no effects on vulture species. I have attached to this email an article about the use of diclofenac in Asia and Africa, though I will say this article was written in 2008 and is therefore not the most up to date information around but has a good background of the topic. 
 
In 2012, the governments of African countries met in Kenya to discuss the use of veterinary drugs and their effects on vultures. The outcome of this meeting called for the authorities to effectively regulate the import, manufacture, sale and use of poisons, including agricultural chemicals and pharmaceutical products known to be lethal to vultures. However, we have recently tried to assess the use of diclofenac in several countries in North Africa, and while we can see no evidence that it is being used to treat cattle, there is see no evidence that it is not being used either.  We are currently working with our birdlife partners in Africa to raise the profile of the problems associated with the drug and promote the alternative use of meloxiam. Considering your nearest country is Morocco, the organisation that is responsible for looking after birds there is Grepom, also a birdlife partner, http://grepom.org/fr/contact/. You could try contacting them, though their web page is in French, I don’t know if this would be an issue for you.
 
The sanitary and veterinary conditions in Spain are very different to those in the subcontinent of India, which will minimise the exposure of the vultures to carcasses that have been contaminated with diclofenac. Yet both species that are nesting in your area, the Eurasian Griffon Vulture and the Egyptian Vulture, have both seen a decline in numbers in India due to diclofenac, furthermore vultures only need to ingest a very small amount of the drug for it to be lethal. Unfortunately due to the feeding habitats of vultures, gathering around a single carcass, means that the drug can wipe out entire populations very quickly. I would suggest also contacting the SEO/ Birdlife Spain (http://www.seo.org/) they may be able to advise you on the activities and research they are carrying out in your area and how you can get involved with the cause.
 
With regard to lobbying against the drugs companies I would begin with by finding out which companies make the veterinary drugs that are used in Spain, and letting them know of the concerns you and your local group are having. Potentially bring in other local or national wildlife organisations if you can. I would also suggest you try involving some political figures, the more people of prominence that you can voice your concerns to will highlight the problem, especially in your local area.
 
I hope this information helps Paula, and if you would like any more information please do not hesitate to contact us.
 
Thank you
 
Danielle
 
Danielle Meyer
Wildlife Adviser

UK Headquarters The Lodge, Sandy, Bedfordshire SG19 2DL
Tel 01767 693119

rspb.org.uk

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Offline John C

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« Reply #65 on: May 31, 2014, 11:20 AM »
It gets worse ..... recent research indicates diclofenac kills eagles too - see http://www.rspb.org.uk/news/369953-new-study-shows-vulturekilling-drug-kills-eagles-too

Offline Clive

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« Reply #66 on: November 21, 2014, 09:15 AM »
Hi All,

Apart from this amazing topic here on  sign which we started way back when pretty much everything you need to know now about this disgusting drug proven to kill vultures in their millions can be found over at the Vulture foundation.... Loads of papers and up to date news...

http://www.4vultures.org/our-work/campaigning-to-ban-diclofenac-in-europe/

Follow them on facebook as well
https://www.facebook.com/vultureconservationfoundation
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Offline Clive

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« Reply #67 on: November 25, 2014, 20:01 PM »
Write to your MP and get diclofenac usage stopped!

You can download a prepared letter from this webpage.....

http://www.4vultures.org/2014/11/25/vultures-need-you-please-write-to-your-meps-about-veterinary-diclofenac/
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Offline Waste-Dweller

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« Reply #68 on: November 25, 2014, 23:46 PM »
I'm adding a paragraph about quinolones, the over-use of which is of great concern.

Offline Clive

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« Reply #69 on: November 26, 2014, 08:28 AM »
Start a new topic about quinolones Waste Dweller please so that we can all learn :) thanks...
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Offline Waste-Dweller

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« Reply #70 on: November 26, 2014, 09:45 AM »
Thank you, I will.  :)

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« Reply #71 on: December 04, 2014, 21:35 PM »
I haven't had time to read the whole thread, but want to mention that Diclofenac is a NSAID in the highly suspect Cox-2 inhibitor class, like Merck's Vioxx which caused so very many fatal heart attacks, Celebrex, Previcox - which is veterinary Vioxx and still prescribed for animals.. although there are many doctors, vets and researchers who feel that the whole class should be withdrawn. Pharmageddon or wot. Pharmaceutical comapanies are fourth most prosperous trade in the world and the larger ones are also agro-chemical and biotech companies and invloved in a lot of shady business. Bayer kills bees, so why would you tust their so-called medicines? The same applies to all the others pharma-companies.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2014, 11:22 AM by Waste-Dweller »

Offline Clive

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« Reply #72 on: December 06, 2014, 11:54 AM »
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Offline Clive

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« Reply #73 on: April 05, 2017, 09:49 AM »
The latest news about the use of Diclofenac in Spain (and the world) can be found on the Vulture Conservation Council website...

https://www.4vultures.org/our-work/campaigning-to-ban-diclofenac-in-europe/

The VCF has led, in collaboration with many other environmental groups, an international advocacy and communications campaign aiming to ban veterinary diclofenac in Europe.  We will continue to work with our partners to achieve our aim – prevent any risk to Europe´s vultures by eliminating this drug from the food chain. We are now lobbying the EU Commission, and the European Parliament, to address the issue, and take the only sensible and risk-free decision – #banvetdiclofenac!
« Last Edit: April 05, 2017, 09:51 AM by Clive »
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Offline Clive

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« Reply #74 on: July 05, 2017, 10:04 AM »
Sorry, a long post but really important for our vultures here in Spain..... Please follow the link to the dedicated site and add your signature to the petition to ban diclofenac.....  sign (http://www.banvetdiclofenac.com/en/act/)

http://www.birdlife.org/europe-and-central-asia/pr/3-july-2017

BirdLife Europe & Central Asia Press release - 3 July 2017
Five European nature conservation organizations unite to call for a ban on veterinary diclofenac, a drug that kills vultures.
Five European environmental organizations - SEO / BirdLife, SPEA (BirdLife in Portugal), Vulture Conservation Foundation, BirdLife Europe and WWF – are re-launching a campaign to ban veterinary diclofenac in Europe - and in particular in Spain, Italy and Portugal, the three European Union countries where most of the continent's vultures live. This anti-inflammatory drug, harmless to humans, can potentially kill thousands of necrophagous (feeding on corpses) birds and its use is unnecessary, since there are equally effective veterinary alternatives.

The new campaign, featuring a dedicated web site and a petition campaign calling for citizen support (http://www.banvetdiclofenac.com/en/home/) brings together all updated information on the approval, commercialization and risks posed by vet diclofenac in Europe as well as a clear appeal and message for civil society to mobilise and protect Europe’s vultures. Together with the communication tools, the leading organisations will coordinate specific policy and advocacy action at both national and EU level (from veterinary groups and farmer associations to municipalities, regional governments and the European Commission). A video will be launched later in the summer along with follow-up activities at the EU level later in the year.

Birds are exposed to the drug by feeding on the corpses of animals which have previously been treated. Its pernicious effect on vultures was documented on the Indian subcontinent, where the presence of diclofenac in only 1% of the carcasses of abandoned cows in the field led to the near extinction - by 99% - of five species of Vultures: the White-backed vulture, the Red-headed vulture, the Slender-billed vulture, the White-rumped vulture and the Indian vulture. Its use is now banned in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Iran and Pakistan, which has now slowed the decline of necrophagous populations.

Despite this catastrophe, the veterinary use of diclofenac is permitted both by the European Union and by the national governments of Spain and Italy. In Portugal, the authorities are assessing their authorization. Moreover, recently the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Sanitary Products (AEMPS), concluded that each year around 6,000 griffon vultures in the country could die as a result of diclofenac. That means an annual decline of more than 7%.

"Prohibiting the veterinary use of diclofenac is not only a matter of common sense but also a matter of law. The precautionary principle - which requires avoiding unnecessary risks - governs all environmental conservation regulations in Europe. Authorizing a drug with a potential deadly effect on birds that we must protect does not seem to be a measure consistent with this legal requirement," explains Iván Ramírez, Head of Conservation for BirdLife Europe & Central Asia.

Vultures are nature’s clean-up crew. They don’t kill, they eat the flesh of other dead animals, thus helping to reduce the spread of disease and eliminating the need for the treatment and incineration of thousands of tons of animal remains every year, saving us millions of euros in waste management and potential emissions of hundreds of thousands of tons of C02 per year.

Yet they are one of the most threatened bird groups on the planet, with 16 of its 23 species at serious risk of extinction. In this context, Spain has a key role in its conservation, as home to 95% of Europe's black and griffon vultures.
The fate and survival of vultures, such critical species, will depend on the engagement, mobilization and commitment of European citizens and political leadership – the www.banvetdiclofenac.com campaign hopes to ensure that outcome. ENDS

For further information, please contact:
Iván Ramírez
Head of Conservation at Birdlife Europe & Central Asia
Ivan.Ramirez@birdlife.org
Mobile +34 646 477 962
Miguel López Rubio
Press officer at SEO/BirdLife
mlopez@seo.org
Tel. (+34) 914340910 / (+34) 655101884
Notes:
Visit the campaign website http://www.banvetdiclofenac.com/en/home/

BirdLife Europe and Central Asia is a partnership of 48 national conservation organisations and a leader in bird conservation. Our unique local to global approach enables us to deliver high impact and long term conservation for the benefit of nature and people. BirdLife Europe and Central Asia is one of the six regional secretariats that compose BirdLife International. Based in Brussels, it supports the European and Central Asian Partnership and is present in 47 countries including all EU Member States. With more than 4100 staff in Europe, two million members and tens of thousands of skilled volunteers, BirdLife Europe and Central Asia, together with its national partners, owns or manages more than 6000 nature sites totalling 320,000 hectares.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 10:09 AM by Clive »
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Offline Clive

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« Reply #75 on: July 05, 2017, 10:06 AM »
Here is the link to add your name to the petition....
http://www.banvetdiclofenac.com/en/act/
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