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Nature-related sayings 'n' proverbs, etc.

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Offline lisa

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« Reply #20 on: May 03, 2007, 07:55 AM »
Thanks Technpat! I was just going to post the question here but see you'd already picked up on my boob mistake of saying translation when I meant equivalent saying.
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #21 on: May 03, 2007, 12:08 PM »
Greetings Lisa,
I thought it was pose a question, not post a q. Sorry!
Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #22 on: May 07, 2007, 17:00 PM »
Greetings All,
Feeling pretty pleased with myself as I have just come across two Spanish expressions which correspond to take coals to Newcastle which I had used elsewhere - one of 'em I already knew, but hadn't associated it, and t'other was unknown to me. (You have until this time tomorrow.)

Came across them by chance - as is so often the case - while looking for Lisa's wattle and daub at (http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php?topic=162.msg2074#msg2074) (needless to say, have so far drawn a blank) but was checking up on avellano - RAE - 2. m. Madera de este árbol, dura y correosa, muy usada para aros de pipas y barriles.

Went off on a wild goose chase with remero de leña which I came across at an admittedly dubious source as no other place confirms this use.

Not giving up yet.
Regs.
Technopat
« Last Edit: January 14, 2008, 23:26 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Dave

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« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2007, 17:29 PM »
Hi Technopat and All
to take coals to Newcastle, the nearest Spanish saying appears to be - ir a vendimiar y llevar uvas de postre- literal translation - to say about a person that when they do something they do not show good judgement.
Wattle and Daub - Zarzos y Barro - literal translation - hurdles and mud, hurdles being woven strips of wood
Regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2007, 18:46 PM »
Greetings Dave,
1. Not bad, but my two are even more literal - keep on searching!

2. Yes, I got zarzos also -

RAE:
zarzo.

(Del ant. sarzo, y este der. de sarzir, zurcir).

1. m. Tejido de varas, cañas, mimbres o juncos, que forma una superficie plana.

2. m. Cosa realizada con este tejido.


but it hadn't occurred to me to join it up with mud (Elementary, my dear W.). Googling with your zarzos y barro gives us loads of links:
At random:
http://www.funjdiaz.net/folklore/07ficha.cfm?id=900

Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Dave

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« Reply #25 on: May 08, 2007, 14:31 PM »
hi Technopat,
you certainly hit the nail on the head in the Toffa intro in introducing ourselves, just for once the translation is literal dar en el clavo or acertar on the nail theme to nail somebody down issujetar algo con clavos to pay on the nail pagar a tocateja.
regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #26 on: May 08, 2007, 15:11 PM »
Greetings Dave and All,
Not sure 'bout your Sp. version of nail somebody down - will be back on that one.

Regs.
Technopat

Ps.
Time's running out for the other two versions of taking coals to Newcastle apart from Dave's ir a vendimiar y llevar uvas de postre which isn't quite right (I reckon).

Pps.
For those of you who haven't already done so, I strongly recommend putting the Real Academia Española (RAE) URL (http://www.rae.es/) on your toolbar - I managed to paste it on my Firefox - or was it Google? - without any problem, just by following the simple instructions, but don't ask me to remember how (i.e. if I could figure it out so easily ...). It's not the world's user-friendliest dictionary, nor the most-up-to-date, but it is definitive by Spanish standards, and there's always the odd handy expression that crops up ...

Ppps.
I use it primarily for those pesky acentos or tildes 'cos you just can't trust Bill Gates' spell checker!
« Last Edit: January 14, 2008, 23:27 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #27 on: May 08, 2007, 16:03 PM »
Right folks,
Time's up!
Failed in English AND in Spanish! ;D
Dave just about scraped through - I'll give 'im the benefit of the d. 'cos I'm in a good mood and also 'cos I haven't yet been able to substantiate my accusation against his suggestion.
Out of the g. of my heart I was going to extend the fecha de entrega, and give you all another 24 hours, but as there's plenty more where those came from, decided not to feel sorry for you and will press on as planned:

llevar leña al monte and ... wait for it! ... llevar hierro a Vizcaya

Aren't they beauts?
My next project (long term) is to see how old these expressions are, i.e. look for early references to them, just to compare 'em with the Newcastle crack (turn of last century, many Brits (engineers, etc.) were working in that part of the country - as well as in Cádiz, etc.).

Regs.
Technopat
« Last Edit: January 14, 2008, 23:28 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline nick

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« Reply #28 on: May 08, 2007, 17:09 PM »
Where they also set up football clubs. Sorry all, nothing to do with nature, though at a push geological/geographical

The oldest football club in Spain is Huelva Recreation Club, formed on December 23 1889 by Dr. Alexander McKay and British workers employed by the Rio Tinto Company. Although Gimnàstic de Tarragona was formed in 1886, the club did not form an actual football team until 1914. The first official football game played in Spain took place in Seville on March 8, 1890 at the Tablada Hippodrome. Huelva Recreation Club played the Colonia inglesa sevillana, a team made up of workers from the Seville Water Works. With the exception of two Spanish players on the Huelva team, all the players on both teams were British. The Seville team won 2-0

In the Basque Country during the early 1890s, British shipyard workers and miners formed Bilbao Football Club and Basque students returning from Britain founded the Athletic Club in 1898. This early British influence was reflected in the use of English names such as Recreation Club, Athletic Club and Football Club
. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Football_in_Spain

« Last Edit: May 08, 2007, 17:26 PM by nick »
Nick
http://iberianature.com/barcelona/history-of-barcelona/spanish-civil-war-tour-in-barcelona/
Spanish Civil War Tours in Barcelona
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A guide to the environment, climate, wildlife, & nature of Spain
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #29 on: May 08, 2007, 17:52 PM »
Greetings Nick and All,
Beg to differ re: non-nature-related posting, 'cos if for no other reason, Rio Tinto Z. must figure high on the list of Europe's most polluting firms ever.
More on Brit influence later.
Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Dave

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« Reply #30 on: May 10, 2007, 13:46 PM »
hi Technopat
From the high altitude waterlily thread
Se me cruzaron los cables,
I used to get my wires crossed all the time when I worked for BT
regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #31 on: May 13, 2007, 23:38 PM »
Greetings Dave and All,
You're lucky - you only used to get 'em crossed - I still do on a daily basis!

Here's today's great Sp. expression - no idea of an equivalent En. version -:

Someone from Zamora has just told me a local saying: Genista florida, loba parida, referring to the increased birthrate of wolves coinciding with that plant's flowering.

But not only that, but he says that recent research has shown that during this period, apparently both male wolves and those females which have not given birth show marked increases in their levels of prolactin, which is considered the hormone of motherhood.

Regs.
Technopat
« Last Edit: January 14, 2008, 23:29 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Dave

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« Reply #32 on: May 14, 2007, 10:07 AM »
Hi Technopat and All
I put your dicho into the Internet and lo and behold it came up with a great article http://www.parador.es/castellano/revista/19/PA19Naturaleza.pdf
The saying translates as Flowering Broom, wolfcubs Loom what is more it Rhymes.
this is similar to another Broom saying from the L.O.G
When broom is not in flower love is out of season (in truth in the L.O.G. Broom is in flower most of the year)
Regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #33 on: May 14, 2007, 13:05 PM »
Greetings Dave,
Many thanx for that - both link and rhyme.
Or I'm having a serious bout of déjà  vu or someone mentioned the "love out of season" crack somewhere here recently.
regs.
Technopat
« Last Edit: January 14, 2008, 23:29 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Dave

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« Reply #34 on: May 14, 2007, 14:17 PM »
hi Technopat
Yes I did, sorry, must stop repeatinggggggggggggg myself
regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #35 on: May 14, 2007, 16:46 PM »
Greetings Dave and All,
Was so chuffed to see your posting with the En. translation to the genista/loba saying (Flowering Broom, wolfcubs Loom), which as you say rhymed nicely - too nicely, it turns out >:D, that I didn't pay much attensh. to the source :o **. Have been unable to find any ref. to that saying anywhere, so would def. seem to be a bad case of poetic licence going down here. Pity. 'cos it works, mate!

So the bottom-line is that the hunt is still on for an En. equiv. to Genista florida, loba parida? (Dave is still the odds-on favourite)

**Paradores, despite having just about the best business going in Spain, are not precisely famous for their translations, in spite of having astronomical budget to that end. I know, 'cos I once came this close to managing it!

Regs.
Technopat

Ps.
(True Ib. Pen. anecdote follows: some years ago, yours truly was approached (sounds bad!) by vice-president Paradores with a view to complete and urgent overhaul of their translating effort. More than flattered, cancelled all other prior engagements and spent the following 3 days and nights, give or take catnaps, preparing a project for setting up a team of dedicated translators, to be led by yours truly, who is not a translator, but can tell a good trans. from a bad one.). Presented great project, to be submitted to the board the following Wednesday for approval, mere formality, as it had already been approved by president, and the then presidente del gobierno goes and decides it's time to do a reshuffle Monday. Everything on hold pending new appointments - whole new lot in following week - dreadfully sorry - quality translations not priority. Thank you very much - don't call us, we'll ... (No sour grapes  - translation, anyone?) - to be fair, quality has improved over the last few years).
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Dave

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« Reply #36 on: May 14, 2007, 19:54 PM »
Hi Technopat
Meaning of sour grapes

Acting meanly after a disappointment.

Origin

In the fable The Fox and the Grapes, which is attributed to the ancient Greek writer Aesop, the fox isn't able to reach the grapes and declares them to be sour - "the grapes are probably sour anyway!".

Some of the fables associated with Aesop were written as late as 1900. It isn't clear when the Fox and the Grapes story originated.

The phrase also occurs in the Bible, Ezekiel XVIII 2 (King James Version):

    The fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children's teeth are set on edge.

All I have to do now is wade through a Spanish Bible, see you in a month
Regards
Dave
Copyright the phrase finder

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #37 on: May 14, 2007, 20:39 PM »
Greetings Dave,
Gooooooooogling gave the following joya:
"Patres comederunt uvam acerbam et dentes filiorum obstipuerunt", Ezequiel, xviii ;D
Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #38 on: June 12, 2007, 11:21 AM »
Greetings Dave,
Your morder el polvo (not to be confused with "bite the dust") needs someone to do it to someone else, i.e. hacerle morder el polvo, which has more violent connotations than yer umbles/numbles. So I can't voluntarily morder el polvo.

Maybe hacerle morder el polvo is something like (but not quite) "rub it in" - but not the nose or face?

Yet another one that'll have to be put out to graze till (it's time for) the cows to come home (Sp. anyone?), I'm afraid.

Still in a state of humbleness regs.
Technopat

Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #39 on: January 11, 2008, 11:24 AM »
Greetings All,
Came across my arch-enemy, the
Quote
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banner here, and it just won't do.

I know it's been said before elsewhere, but as part of Technopat's ongoing crusade to raise the linguistic level - both Spanish and English - of this 'ere great iberianatureforum, and given the amount of interesting words that crop up and the very-frequent inadequateness of bilingual dictionaries, especially as regards expressions and sayings, thought I'd bring up the little matter of Simon's inspired use of rumpled, rugged and ruffled all in the same posting.

So, which of 'em fits best with the Spanish arrugado/a  :dancing:

Regs.,
Technopat
« Last Edit: January 11, 2008, 13:09 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266