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You're an animal.... Book review

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Offline Technopat

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« on: June 05, 2008, 23:05 PM »
Greetings All,
Posting this here 'cos it's not a Spanish book or about Spain, and therefore doesn't belong on the book thread.
Am currently re-reading a great book which I have had occasion to mention before: in Sp., ¡Eres una bestia, Viskovitz! and in En. translation, You’re An Animal, Viskovitz!, by the Italian/Russian writer Alessandro Boffa.

Point is, I just happened to come across a review which said that it's available through Amazon - which means it can be ordered through the INF bookshop.

No idea how well it's been translated into English, but the Spanish version is excellently translated, i.e. it's very funny in Spanish, which means that the translator knows his biz. :clapping:

I-really-do-recommend-it regs.,
Technopat
« Last Edit: June 14, 2008, 15:40 PM by Clive »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2008, 10:33 AM »
PS.
Sorry, forgot to add the synopsis and reviews:
http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?isbn=0375405283
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2008, 14:59 PM »
Greetings All,
Have just finished reading it for the 3rd time – really recommend it. It’s a sort of a mix ‘tween Roald Dahl and Darwin, but from the perspective of Viskovitz and his love life...

Here’s an excerpt, roughly translated from Spanish. I don’t think anyone can complain about copyright, ‘cos the logical outcome of y’all reading it here is that someone will buy a copy...

You’re the lowest of the low, Viskovitz!
“Ljuba, why don’t you love me?” I asked.
“Because you’re a worm. You’re despicable, you’re spineless, you haven’t got balls!”
“Yeah, but apart from all that?”
“Because you are so dull, you’ve got no brains, no character, no sensitivity!”
“And what else?”
“You don’t know how to love. You have no heart.”
“Yeah, yeah, and what else?”
“You’ve got a tiny penis.”
“And that's it?”
"No, Visko. There’s more. You never think of me, you’re selfish, a parasite. You only take – never give. You live off me. You don’t do anything. You have no interest in anything. You’re making me waste away. You irritate me constantly. When will you stop tormenting me?”
A shiver of disgust and revulsion ran through her body. And again.
I clung to the mucous lining of her gut with my sucker until her fit of anger had passed and then wiped the blood from my trunk.
“And what are my flaws?”

Regs.,
Technopat
PS.
For the psychologists among you, the only reason I chose this particular one was that it’s the shortest - there are other, better ones in the book :dancing: .
« Last Edit: June 14, 2008, 15:42 PM by Clive »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Simon

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« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2009, 10:41 AM »
Can't not rise to that Teeps - a clear case of proboscis envy I feel.

Now over to the (psycho)-linguist in me . . .

Quote
You only take – never give. You live off me.

Surely it's "You live off of me." Phrasal verb, to live off, plus preposition of. I expect that you have the same trouble as me, honoured sire, that the preposition 'of' used after a verb sounds so damned Yankee  :technodevil:

Regs

Simon

Offline Bob M

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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2009, 13:31 PM »
Hi.

"To live off" (something or someone) sounds fine to me.

For example:

"I life off the money I make selling doughnuts."

Also, a quick Google for "to live off" + "phrasal verb" gets a lot more hits than, "to live off of" + "phrasal verb".

Or are you suggesting that they both exist, but that there is a difference in meaning?

Cheers.


Bob
« Last Edit: July 22, 2009, 23:35 PM by Bob M »

Simon

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« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2009, 21:02 PM »
Ho Bob,

I knew I could depend on someone in the 'ere Madhouse Forum to pass an opinion!

I think you're in the right of it, but in the wee wee hours (well. none of us are getting any younger!) I remembered where the idea came from; J. P. Donleavey's excellent 'The Unexpurgated Code' in which the galant young Gentleman (sic) is acquainted with the niceties of urbane living.

In the unfortunate case of being roughed up by some villain, one of the "bootless and unhorsed" he is encouraged to drop into the vernacular, something like, "get your filthy paws off of my tux, you creep!" rather than the more genteele, "Unhand me you cad!" The former was judged to be likely to have greater effect as the adversary would be put off his guard by the lapse into his own street slang, and perhaps think, if he were capabe of thought, that under the hero's welll-groomed, nay, pampered, exterior, lay a mean-hitting street cat like himself.

Sadly, I've long since lost my copy to the jowls of the Eternal Borrower, but I urge you to read on!

Simon

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2009, 02:50 AM »
Greetings Simon & Bob,
Sorry for not having joined in the fray earlier - or should that be sooner - but I'm still catching up with what's been going down at this 'ere great forum over the past few months.

You're right, Simon, I've always rejected "live off of" as being a Yankee thing. That said, I keep discovering that many expressions and usage of English I've always associated with US English, are in fact of GB English origin - brunch & gotten being two notable examples. I can well imagine the offending three-part verb being used in the contexts JPD depicted. By way of example, I only found out that the past and past participle of the verb bring was not brang and brung respectively, when towards the end of my teacher training and I came across a list of irregular verbs for the first time :dancing:

And what say ye 'bout "Get off of the table!"? - I reckon both would come about as analogies of "get out of".

Thanks for reminding me about Donleavey - it's been years since I read The Ginger Man - an excellent book also. I only recently found out that he bought the Olympia Press.

Re. nuances, would either of you (or any other interested iberianatureforumer) say there was any difference 'tween "He lived off his wits"* and "He lived by his wits"? This is not a loaded question, just pure curiosity.

*I think we'd all agree that it would seem strange to say "He lived off of his wits"

However, the bottom line is - have any of you read Viskovitch yet?

Cheers!
Sebastian-Dangerfield-is-yer-man regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266