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Non-spore producing fungi

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Offline Bob M

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« on: October 11, 2009, 13:32 PM »
Hi.  I need some help from experts.

I went out collecting fungi with a friend for the first time yesterday and he claimed that there were two types of fungi.  The ones with "ribs" on the underside which produce spores, and others which had a collection of tubes on the underside.  When you rub your funger over these tubes they turn blue or black - at least the ones we saw did.

He maintained that this second type of fungi had no known reproductive function but that the majority of this type were perfectly safe to eat.

Can anybody improve my education?

Thanks.

Bob


Offline Technopat

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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2009, 20:44 PM »
Greetings Bob M,
Yer "ribs" are known as gills or lamellae and yer tubes are indeed tubes or pores. :clapping: and are typical of boleti, as in Penny Buns/Ceps - Boletus edulis

From there to saying that
Quote
the majority of this type were perfectly safe to eat
is possibly going too far. Safe to eat is an extreme definition suggesting that they are not poisonous, but it don't mean they're tasty or even edible, for that matter.

B. edulis and B. reticulatus are delicious. However, the Tylopilus felleus, which often grows together with the Penny Bun and when young can easily be confused, is too bitter to eat - although the smell is pleasant!

Aha! I hear you Doubting Thomases exclaim - we've spotted the flaw in Tp's argument: The above bitter 'shroom isn't a Boletus, it's a whatchamallit! True, but until recently it was classified as such. And to further confuse things us, gilled ‘shrooms such as the very common Brown Roll-rim Paxillus involutus - once considered edible, is now known to be poisonous and even deadly! – and yes, you guessed it: is now considered as boletus...

So what about all those inedible boleti? ‘Ere goes: B. luridus; B. calopus; B. piperatus; and Tp's all-time fav. - the notorious B. satanas (Devil’s Bolete)  :technodevil:
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2009, 18:35 PM »
PS.
Not very much off-topic, but forgot to mention that certain russulas, while perfectly safe to eat if boiled or fried until well-and-truly cooked, can be poisonous if undercooked - typically when done a la plancha.

As with many other barbecued foodstuffs, many people confuse crisp-and-toasted exterior with thoroughly cooked interior, leading to salmonella, etc. food poisoning.

Tp's-secret-is-to-get-on-good-terms-with-BBQer-and-to-request-an-extra-coupla-mins-for-anything-likely-to-causing-pains regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Bob M

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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2009, 20:44 PM »
Interesting.  Thanks for that.

Any comments on the "no known reproductive function" bit?

Cheers.


Bob

Offline Spanish Footsteps

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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2009, 23:06 PM »
. Hi Bob

What we tend to do is find the mushrooms that we can identify 100% and stick to them only, such as anything else can be interesting research.

Its a good idea to get a small field guide.  These guides will inform you of the 'false' varieties which can be confused with the good ones.

If in doubt, ask someone who knows before you munch on them.
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Offline Bob M

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« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2009, 07:50 AM »
Thank you very much for responding, but that is not what I'm actually wondering about.

I would like to know if it is true that the fungi with tubes or pores have no reproductive function - and if not, what function they do have.

:-)

Cheers.


Bob

Offline nick

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« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2009, 21:51 PM »
Hi Bob,

I think you mean two types of "mushroom" - there are lots of types of fungi e.g. yeast and mould are also both "non-spore producing" fungi.

What I do know is that mushrooms are the reproductive part of the fungi which produce spores...I have no idea whether some don't have this function

Mónica has promised a more detailed answer tomorrow.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2009, 22:52 PM by nick »
Nick
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