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Is Spain's crisis economic or financial or...?

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Offline Technopat

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« on: October 26, 2009, 23:55 PM »
Greetings All,
Following on from Glen's setas scam thread, here's Technopat's simplistic view of what's going on. As this thread promises to be one of those that engages many iberianatureforumers, I shall leave many things unsaid for future postings. :technodevil:

A financial crisis is when the poor banks and all the peripheral money-makers realise that the game is up and that the ficticious money market they operate as a fundamental part of this capitalistic system we've all grown to love so dearly has come to the end of its useful cycle.

This inevitable leads to the equally cyclical phenomenon of banks going bust - as in bankrupt - and equally inevitable having to be bailed out with yon taxpayer's money.

On the other hand, an economic crisis is often, but not necessarily, the result of the above f. c. and results in normal folks like what you and I - taxpayers all -  feeling the crunch and having to tighten our belts.

An equally inevitable consequence of both of the above is that many employers  take advantage of the circs. to lay off staff so that they can take on cheaper labour - I'll never forget listening to J. M. Cuevas, the former head of the CEOE stating - with a perfectly straight face - that he wouldn't consider his job well done until he had succeeded in making everyone understand that the prime function of employers was to create wealth by creating jobs.

Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Clive

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« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2009, 10:13 AM »
Hi Tp :)

I would like to contribute to your devilish topic with the origin or the word

Quote
Most people dread the word bankruptcy, and they do not even want to think about what would happen should they have to file for bankruptcy. But the word itself does have a fascinating history that many people would find interesting. Even for people who are not in a financially binding situation, studying more about bankruptcy and its origins can be an interesting task. Learning about bankruptcy can also prove useful should the need to know more detailed information ever arise.

The actual origin of the word bankruptcy comes from the Latin. There are two separate words that have different meanings in Latin that when combined together eventually came to make up the word bankruptcy. These words are “bancus,” which means a bench or a table, and “ruptus,” which means broken. It is easy to tell how the two words were combined to make up the modern version of the word bankruptcy. However, there is a rhyme and a reason behind the origin of the word.

In ancient times, some of the first bankers were located in public places, where they conducted their business. These early bankers usually conducted their business at a bench, which they had set up in the public place. If the banker were to fail his customers or if his business was found to be unsound in any way, the banker would be driven out of business or would eventually have to shut down. When the banker was out of business, the bench on which he conducted his dealings would be broken. When the bench was broken, it signified to people in the public place that the banker was no longer good for doing business.

Today, of course, benches are no longer being broken. Instead, the word bankruptcy has been combined from the two ancient Latin words and the broken bench is now signified figuratively by the word bankrupt. When a person or company is bankrupt, they are no longer “good” for doing business, so thus the word actually applies in its full meaning even today. Although having the label of bankrupt is not a desirable goal for anyone, knowing a little history behind the name can make learning about bankruptcy less tedious.

The above is blatantly quoted from a random website I found about the subject
http://www.bankruptnomore.com/bankruptcy-history.shtml

:)

PS tip of the day... Did you know that most browsers will make the tiny quoted text bigger when you hold down control and press the plus + key... Control and minus - key to make it smaller.....
« Last Edit: October 27, 2009, 10:14 AM by Clive »
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2009, 17:04 PM »
Thanks for aportación (En. anyone?)

Re. Clive's tip o' the day, for those of us/you with scroll wheels aka mouse wheels, you can do the same by pressing cntrl and moving the wheel towards you (bigger text) or away from you (smaller text).

But-Clive's-tip-also-works-for-laptops-with-touchpads regs.,
Technopat

Ps.
How's 'bout starting a thread on each board with a tip o' the day/month? Some postings include 'em as a matter of course, but it might be a good idea to structure 'em for easier future reference (back to my old idea of key words).
Asparagus tapas & tipples tips spring readily to mind, of course, closely followed by 'shrooming tips, but for those of you who are into other earthly pleasures, there could be bird-watching tips, orchid-hunting tips, jellyfish-sting tips, PG tips...

Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266