Iberianature Forum

Toadstool of the arid south-east

  • 11 Replies
  • 5353 Views

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Jill

  • *
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 494
    • Jill Dickin Schinas
« on: May 01, 2007, 10:37 AM »
Hullo Shroomeys,

I was very surprised to find these toadstools growing in our arid little corner of the kingdom. They are on Isla Perdiguera, in the Mar Menor. Some American yotties told us that they had been collecting mushrooms here and eating them, but if this is the thing that they were talking about - well, i'll stick to eating the ones in Mercadona!
Note that the second picture shows a toadstool which has actually lifted a fair-sized lump of rock! It really is amazing what plants can do. ("It's just osmosis, Mummy," says my son. He's right, I suppose - but I'm still just as impressed.)

Can anybody give them a name, and let me know whether those American sailors are likely still to be in the land of the living?

Jill

Simon

  • *
  • Guest
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2007, 01:05 AM »
Hi Jill,

We get loads of these up here. They seem to speciallise in growing in silt or clay, can be very large and lift prodigeous weights! Neither of our dogs will eat them, which says buckets about thier culinary virute - barget turds are the in thing this season as are putrid rabbt carcases from our local shepherd's corral that even the vultures turn down!

Not sure about what they are called tho', but I'll try to look into it!

Cheers and happy campng

Simon

Offline lisa

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 2439
    • Accommodation and Activities in the Picos de Europa
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2007, 23:10 PM »
What turds  ??? ???
www.picos-accommodation.co.uk
Accommodation, ski touring, snowshoeing, walking and info on the flora and fauna of the Picos de Europa.
SAVE SPANISH BEARS!
And now,
The Picos de Europa
Your complete English guide to these beautiful mountains of Northern Spain.

Offline Clive

  • *
  • Administrator
  • Full Shroomy
  • *****
  • Posts: 2990
  • Sierra de Grazalema
    • Wildside Walking Holidays - Spain
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2007, 00:11 AM »
Hola,

Barget turds of course...Gosh It's quite clear... ;D

Whats a barget ???

Clive
Explore the nature of Iberia at www.wildsideholidays.com

The beautiful town of Ronda, the City of Dreams?

The spectacular Caminito del Rey, El Chorro and Guadalhorce reservoirs El Camino del Rey

Offline Technopat

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 3020
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2007, 00:48 AM »
Geeritnsg Alñ,

Pssobily a mipsirnt fro badger;D

Greds,
Tcehnoprat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Simon

  • *
  • Guest
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2007, 18:57 PM »
Hi Jill and all,

Yes, Mr missaprop is back, it was meant to be badger turds (OK I just typed 'turnds' which I rather like.

Any guesses on a piece of genuine old Shropshire, "Egog"?

Ciao - diary explaining where I've been to follow!

Simon  :dancing:

Offline Jill

  • *
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 494
    • Jill Dickin Schinas
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2007, 16:54 PM »
Hullo ‘Shroom-lovers!

The Mollymawks are delighted to be able to report that we are now back from the land of non-stop rain and wooly jumpers. The change from 16 degrees to 44 (in Córdoba) was a bit of a shock, but we survived it and are now back in La Manga. (Full report on Driving Across Spain from Roxanne, elsewhere on the forum - eventually.)

While we were “over there” I happened, one day, to take shelter in a library and grasped the opportunity to hunt for this mysterious Toadstool of the Arid South East. I had expected that Technopat, or Dave, or Sue would have long since come up with an answer. Well, I searched through every d___ book on the shelf, but to no avail. That toadstool just doesn’t exist!

One month later – last Monday, in fact – I found out why the mysterious red toadstool is not in any Mushroom book. I picked up a copy of Collins complete Mediterranean Wildlife – a book that I’ve not seen before – and there, amongst the flowering plants, was my bogus fungus! It bears the name Cynomorium coccineum and is described thus:

“Short stem covered in overlapping scales supporting club-shaped spike of densely packed flowers.”

Perhaps, if I had got Roxanne to look more closely, she would have detected that the spongy “club” was actually made up of tightly packed flowers. Indeed, if I hadn’t been looking for the mushrooms which were said to grow on the island, and expecting to find mushrooms, I might, perhaps, have noticed it myself!
 
This weird flower is “parasitic on plants of salt-laden, sandy soil and rocky ground”, all of which fits the bill perfectly – except that it wasn’t growing on another plant. Nor (if I remember rightly) was the one in Mr Collins’ photo, so I suppose there must be something going on underground...

There were also a number of yellow-flowered spikes sticking up out of the sand in the same vicinity. I’ve seen these before. They’re sort of vaguely like a hyacinth in shape. I think they’re called Cistanche. Like the weird wonder above they lack leaves or a green stem, so they can’t be feeding through photosynthesis. Perhaps they’re parasites too... or perhaps, like fungi, they feed on dead plant material... ?
 
Jill

Offline Technopat

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 3020
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2007, 19:18 PM »
Greetings Jill and Crew,
Welcome back to civilisation! Look forward to reports from the LOG and/or outward/inward journey. Hope all are well.

Re. your pseudo-'shroom. Thanx for the ID on that. Now that you've got the name, I get "Malta-Fungus" (weird structure, but possibly a back-translation of the Italian Wikipedian) and Goooooooooooogling (sorry, Clive! - long story, Jill. You'll find it elsewhere among all the threads you've got to catch up on!) taking a Google gave me various refs. including the following:

http://herbarivirtual.uib.es/cas-med/especie/5143.html

http://www.hoseito.com/FLORES%20SILVESTRES/Cynomorium%20coccineum.htm

(none of which are as magnificent as the specimen you posted!). Had actually given up hope of finding what it was 'cos none of my sources had a clue - and was trusting to the 'shroom Gods to give me a clue.

Stay-out-of-the-sun-regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 3020
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2007, 01:18 AM »
Greetings iberianatureforumers,
For the land-lubbers among us, the solution to Jill's cryptic reference to Mollymawks can be found at this Wikipedia article:dancing:
Regs.
Technopat

Ps.
That said, the reference to Mollymawks on a forum devoted to iberianature is more than puzzling given that said species is rarely, if ever, seen on the Ib. Pen. (although Spanish-speaking regions of the Southern Hem. would certainly have had at least eye contact with 'em) - another example of the effects of climate change?  >:D
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 3020
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2007, 15:27 PM »
Greetings Caesar,
Could it be that yer English friend is expressing that fine humour Brits are world-famous for and is simply referring to your boat as the Mollymawk (albatros in Sp.) he saw in the Mar Menor?
Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 3020
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2007, 00:17 AM »
Greetings Caesar,
The same thought had crossed my mind and Dave, earlier this evening, mentioned the large number of gulls around and I again wondered if I too might have seen 'em and taken for granted they were just gulls of one kind or another.
By the w., Dave mentioned the relative silence of gulls in Asturias (which I too had noticed but not thought about till Dave pointed it out) are the gulls on the Med. noisy or quiet? Could it depend whether they are well-fed or fighting for food?
Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Jill

  • *
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 494
    • Jill Dickin Schinas
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2007, 12:15 PM »
Whaaat? This boy spends too long gazing into his computer screen and not enough on deck. Ask Roxanne; there are lots of gulls around here, and they're noisy.