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Is this mistletoe??

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Offline Maria

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« on: September 24, 2010, 15:55 PM »
Hi

Whilst in the Sierra Cazorla recently, I noticed lots of the pine trees had this stuff growing on them. Is it mistletoe and is this a normal place for it to grow??

Maria

Offline Dave

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« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2010, 18:23 PM »
Hi Maria
Yes definitely Mistletoe, according to the Internet, Mistletoe plants grow on a wide range of host trees, and heavy infestations can kill the host tree.
Regards
Dave

Offline Maria

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« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2010, 18:25 PM »
Hi Dave

Thanks for that, it was all over the trees in Cazorla Natural Park. I guess if anyone wants mistletoe then thats the place to go get some  :)

Maria

Offline quentin

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« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2011, 19:50 PM »
Maria,

Did you know that Mistle Thrushes are responsible for the mistletoe. I just borrowed this from a website called "Bird Table News"

"After feeding on the mistletoe the mistle thrush tries to clean its beak on a branch
It does this to try to get rid of the stickyness of its beak.
When it does this the mistletoe sticks to the branch and grows into misltetoe.
Apple and Hawthorn are common trees and bushes were mistletoe grows.

So mistle thrushes play an important part in spreadinga mistletoe and misltetoe plays and important part in feeding mistle thrushes."

 So Mistle Thrushes are probably indirectly responsible for many a New Year's Eve argument as well as get-togethers!

Andy

Offline steveT

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« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2011, 00:01 AM »
I never new it grew in pine trees....... Its muérdago in spanish ....... a great sounding word. The seed passes through thrushes and sticks to branches, by way of a substance in the mistletoe, from which it the parasite starts its life cycle.

steve

Offline Petrea

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« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2011, 08:04 AM »
Two different species grow in Andalucia. I have inserted a summary of properties below, taken from Flora Vascular de Andalucía Oriental. The one in quesition here is probably the first one.  

1. Viscum album, muérdago blanco, white berries, on Pinus and Crataegus. Alt. 1000–1800 m. Euroasiática y mediterránea. Cazorla, Mágina, Vélez–Baza.

2. Viscum cruciatum, marojo, tiña, muérdago colorado, red berries,  on Crataegus, Olea, Pinus. (200)400–1500(1700) m. Asiática (C y S) y mediterránea. Aljibe, Ronda, Axarquía.

Reviving this subject as Christmas is coming up, yeah?  :santa_afro:

Saludos
Petrea
« Last Edit: December 01, 2011, 08:09 AM by Petrea »
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Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.   (Thomas R. Dewar)

Offline Sue

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« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2011, 11:20 AM »
Hi to All,

there are a lot of red berried mistltoe plants in the Sierra de Grazalema area, frequent in olive trees and on Retama.
A few years back we used a sprig to decorate the house, then placed it in the closest tree to the bird feeding table in the garden. As far as I know it could be the first time it has grown in a Pomegranate tree and it is looking very healthy. It might even flower next spring. I have never seen thrush so close to the house, so presume it was assisted by a blackbird.
I have included some photos to expand this thread, all are of the red berry version, Viscum cruciatum showing the flower (March), the berry, and seeds germinating on a branch. (Not seen the white berried one around here)
regards,
Sue
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Offline Petrea

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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2011, 14:47 PM »
Hello Sue,

Lucky you having one in yor garden! :clapping:  I've been looking for the red berries, because I would like to place one on one of my many olive trees. None around here, but I've been told that they are grow on the inland side of the mountains. So, when will they be ripe?

Saludos
Petrea
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Minds are like parachutes - they only function when open.   (Thomas R. Dewar)

Offline Sue

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« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2011, 15:25 PM »
Hi Petrea,
dates that I've taken photos of seeds germinating are February and April. If I remember the earlier ones were of an altidude around 600m and the later 1000m.  If the winter becomes very cold don't leave it too late as they will all have been eaten.   :santa_wink:

regards,
Sue
« Last Edit: December 02, 2011, 15:27 PM by Sue »
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Offline Bob M

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« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2011, 19:21 PM »
Mistletoe is very common here in the Basque country.  I see it all over the place from around sea level on up. White berries.