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Plant or fungus?

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Offline nick

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« on: May 23, 2007, 20:19 PM »
Hi,

I came across this a few weeks ago in the Sierra de la Culebra and I have no idea what it is.

At first I thought it was some strawberry tree berries which had fallen on the ground.

It was growing at ground level. No sign of photosynthesis. Perhaps it's parasitic.

Thanks
Nick
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Offline Sue

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« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2007, 21:21 PM »
Hi Nick,

I think that what you have there is a parasitic plant.

There is one called Cytinus ruber that grows in Andalucia which uses Cistus species as its host, it looks very similar!

Regards, Sue
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Offline Sue

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« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2007, 21:39 PM »

and, Nick...umm the strawberry tree fruits (Arbutus unedo) drop from the trees around October, November time >:D

 ( >:D borrowed from Technopat due to unfair hogging of said smilie )

 >:D Sue ;)
« Last Edit: May 24, 2007, 16:36 PM by Sue »
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2007, 22:44 PM »
Greetings All,

Totally agree with Sue  :o (but promise not to let it become habit-forming 8)) - whatever it is it is NOT a madroño. We expats living in Madrid tend to know these things - part 'n' parcel of being accepted by the locals.

Regs.
Technopat
« Last Edit: June 12, 2007, 16:25 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Sue

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« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2007, 00:31 AM »

 :-* :P ::) Clive nearly choked on that one!!! ;D
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Offline nick

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« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2007, 09:39 AM »
Cytinus ruber - that will be it

Thanks

What a clanger! Strawberry on my face. And they weren't any madroños in the area!
« Last Edit: May 24, 2007, 11:38 AM by nick »
Nick
http://iberianature.com/barcelona/history-of-barcelona/spanish-civil-war-tour-in-barcelona/
Spanish Civil War Tours in Barcelona
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A guide to the environment, climate, wildlife, & nature of Spain
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Offline Dave

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« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2007, 12:36 PM »
Hi Nick
Cytinus ruber
Nombre común en catalán :  Filosa. Frare d'estepa vermell. Magraneta. Margalida.
Nombre común en castellano :  Hipocístide rojo.
English: not known
Regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2007, 15:32 PM »
Greetings All,
Following Sue's cue on Cytinus, and prompted by Dave, off I went to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rafflesiaceae

which somehow took me to the Universidad Pública de Navarra:

http://www.unavarra.es/servicio/herbario/htm/concepto.htm

where I got the following:
algunas parece que no perjudican a su hospedante, como sucede con Cytinus ruber, parásita de una jara de flores blancas (Cistus albidus) , this latter making me go back to Wikipedia for the following on, surprise, surprise, las jaras:
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cistus

So, the bottom line is: was Nick walking in jara country (as opposed to strawberry tree orchards)?  ;D - Difficult to avoid jara in many parts of the country.

Regs.
Technopat
« Last Edit: June 12, 2007, 16:26 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline nick

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« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2007, 21:31 PM »
The bottom line is that I saw some red fruity things on the ground which looked like fallen fruit and I looked round they weren't any trees. I thought I'd add this to the story as a bit of introduction, though it can't have remained in my head for more than a second. I then  stooped down and realised that they were frimly rooted and living.

Did not expect the Iberian Inquisition.

Off for a kebab

Nick
Nick
http://iberianature.com/barcelona/history-of-barcelona/spanish-civil-war-tour-in-barcelona/
Spanish Civil War Tours in Barcelona
http://www.iberianature.com/
A guide to the environment, climate, wildlife, & nature of Spain
The Amazon/Forum Bookshop - lend us a hand
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/shop/index.htm
And also now The Natural History of Britain
http://iberianature.com/brita