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This monster grew on old tree roots last March

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Offline ValL

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« on: July 09, 2007, 13:52 PM »
In varying stages of it growth



[imghttp://www.talkphotography.co.uk/gallery/data/500/Shrooms_rs_4.jpg[/img]

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2007, 14:19 PM »
Jeez ValL!
Have you got a nuclear plant nearby?  >:D Those things look - as the Yanks say, though they got it from us - awesome!
Looks very similar to the Oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus but as far as I know, it only grows on the sides of deciduous trees and poplars and beeches in particular. Haven't got time right now to check it out further, but will get back on it later.  :booklook:
In the meantime - don't make a revuelto of it. It might just be the wrong time of year or the gills are wrong or any number of no-nos. Even if you do make a positive ID! Unless you've got little kids running 'round, just leave it where it is - it's beautiful!
If you haven't already got any, I'll post some 'Shroom web sites later.
Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2007, 19:33 PM »
Right, ValL and All,
Decided to take a break from work an’ get this off my chest – spent most of the time I should have been concentrating on work mulling things over (lucky I’m not a brain surgeon). Pretty sure it’s of the Pleurotus family, but having checked out most of the web sites I know  :booklook:, have not been able to make a positive ID  :banghead:. Trouble is that if it were Pleurotus, which I’m pretty sure it is, it should have been growing on wood – decaying or otherwise – and although you mention that last year it was, it clearly isn’t this time round. Climate change? Survival of the fittest and adaptation to the medium? Or as I mentioned earlier, nuclear power?

On the other hand, while some sites state that most members of the Pleurotus family are edible, some say that most are not and that there is no evidence to confirm that they are edible. In other words, don’t even touch ‘em with a bargepole.

That said, whenever I feel overwhelmed by the number of bird lovers  >:D, butterfly lovers  :technodevil: and bear lovers  :poketongue: on this ‘ere iberianatureforum, I often retire to  my favourite little nook, or cranny, or thread at the ‘Shroom board and re-read some of the best literature to be found on this ‘ere great forum.

Sorry I haven't been able to give you a pos. ID - not that I would have done anyway given the dire consequences of mistaken identities - but as I think I mentioned earlier, enjoy the aesthetics of the thing in situ (you wouldn't shoot down a golden eagle just to be able to see it close up or if it were edible :speechless:).
Got to get back to work - and leave space for others to stick their oar in ... :technodevil:

Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline ValL

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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2007, 21:57 PM »
hi and thanks, it was a year past March i took the photos and the shroom was growing on the stump of a tree we were told were called the River Tree.

My husband had to chop down the 4 of them, all over 150ft tall as they were breaking up pavement/man next doors patio and the lawn. They were apparently here before the house. The rain eventually broke it up, the stumps were removed later in the year.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2007, 13:11 PM »
Hi ValL and Technopat,

i wonder if your "River Trees" were poplars, they are certainly tall and grow by rivers. The chances are that although the stumps were removed there will be plenty of roots decaying near to the surface, therefore a prime site for the shrooms to grow!

Regards, Sue
Thinking of visiting the beautiful Sierra de Grazalema in Andalucia?
www.grazalemaguide.com

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2007, 16:37 PM »
Greetings ValL and Sue and Technopat and All,
Sue's rationale is where it's at, but don't eat 'em ...
Propose shifting this thread to the water board - a search engine would go crazy: we now have gills, oysters, beeches  :biggrin:, bargepoles, oars, rivers (plus a subtle reference in eagle - anyone :dancing: ?).
Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2007, 17:21 PM »
Could it also explain the lusher colour - as opposed to the usual semi-sickly grey (assuming we're talking 'bout oysters) - more nutrition from various sources rather than just one 'ol rotten/rotting tree?
Regs.
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266