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New word

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Offline Clive

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« on: July 18, 2007, 22:33 PM »
Hola,

There is a new word working around the WWW...

"geckel"

First person to post what it is gets a prize....

Clive
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Offline tonyninfas

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« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2007, 22:48 PM »
Geckel - Is that the new adhesive that is based on a cross between the sticking properties of a gecko's feet and the mussels' ability to cling to rocks ?
Tony

Offline Clive

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« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2007, 22:50 PM »
blimey that was quick Tony...
Explore the nature of Iberia at www.wildsideholidays.com

The beautiful town of Ronda, the City of Dreams?

The spectacular Caminito del Rey, El Chorro and Guadalhorce reservoirs El Camino del Rey

Simon

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« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2007, 06:28 AM »
The whole story is on the Beeeb's  :roxysnail: on line today: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6904175.stm but we had it here first! :sign:

Regs

Simon

« Last Edit: July 19, 2007, 19:37 PM by Wildside »

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2008, 01:35 AM »
Greetings All,
Merriam-Webster's online Word-of-the-Day today was
etiolate
\EE-tee-uh-layt\ verb
: *1 : to bleach and alter the natural development of (a green plant) by excluding sunlight

I'm sure all you biologists and naturalists, etc. use it regularly, but us mere English-as-she-is-spoke language users could surely be forgiven for mistaking it as a synonym of inebriate, as in "inebriated newt".

Wishing to compare with my hardback British English dictionary (NODE), it only appears as an adjective, "etiolated", in the same context, but also gives another, wonderful, meaning as a synonym of "feeble" (Sp. anyone?): a tone of etiolated nostalgia.
Can't-wait-for-y'all-to-give-me-the-opportunity-to-use-that-one regs., :dancing:
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Simon

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« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2008, 03:53 AM »
Thanks for this Teeps,

My Concise Oxford gives me a second definition, maybe the origin of your adjectives; 'to give a sickly hue to (a person) and 'etiolation' n; 'make into haulm (from the French étioler)

"And what's 'haulm'?" I hear you gasp in wonder?. It's a stalk or stem or the collected stems of peas or beans without the pods (my italics) :technodevil: The question is not so much what's the use of a collection of podless beanstalks, but where's the haulm in it?  :dancing:

Much better though is what I found flicking through the COD on my way there, of course! 'embouchure'; a mode of applying the mouth to the mouthpiece of a brass or wind instrument . . , There's magic in these books!

G'night all

Simon

Offline judith

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« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2008, 19:36 PM »
My German principal at herbal college made a beautiful mistake once....he described a patient as being extremely "macerated" rather than "emaciated"! Funny but no-one else in the class could understand why I had to leave the room.

Simon

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« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2008, 20:25 PM »
Hi Judith,

You have to be careful in this wicked company; an archaic meaning of 'macerate' is to waste away by fasting :technodevil:. I suppose the link to the modern usage of 'emaciate' might be that the mortification of the flesh thus caused may appear similar to macerated matter! :clapping:

Meanwhile, while you are no doubt tastefully considering what to do with your sun terrace over the winter months, how about machicolating it, that is "to furnish a parapet, etc. with openings between supporting corbels for dropping stones, etc. on attackers" (Concise Oxford Dictionary). Well, if I am the first such victim I wouldn't entirely blame you!  :dancing:

Regs

Simon

PS I'd be intrigued to know what you could invent for that sinister "etc." for dropping onto the upturned heads of your assailants!

Offline judith

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« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2008, 23:32 PM »
Dear Simon   :technodevil:  ,
 :) :)D*** you you are right! Now that's wiped the smug self-satisfied little grin off my face! Circa 16th Century "to become, or cause to become thin".
Should I decide to build some form of machicolation this winter, which I must admit I hadn't thought of but is now a distinct possibility, I would be obliged if you could stand beneath it, for the purpose of admiring it's crenulations, whilst I use a mangonel to gently cover you with hurl various scats and the hottest pimientos pardrones I can find!
How can you know this stuff?????????  ::)  :speechless:  :)  :)

Simon

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« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2008, 08:30 AM »
Hi Judith,

Yes, scats would be an excellent repellant for one's enemies (heads of which adorning the foot of one's memorial obelisk for the use of :technodevil:), though I prefer 'detritus' as a useful catch all; after all you may not happen to have a scat to hand in case of unexpected guests! :dancing:

As for the words, I recommend a well thumbed hardback edition of the Concise Oxford, training the browsing eyes away from instantaneously spotting the lewd words or phrases that seem to pop out of every page and a passion for onomatopoeia! :booklook:

Regs

Simes

Offline judith

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« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2008, 14:30 PM »
I obviously need more training....the  more lewdicrous a word, the more my eyes are drawn to it.....must be my grandma school education!

Simon

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« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2008, 07:11 AM »
Ooooooooh you are awful - welcome to the dreadful club :clapping:

Simon

Offline Dave

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« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2008, 12:18 PM »
Hi All
Lewdicrous, has to go down as a great misspelling, worthy of  :sign:
Definition:  ridiculously rude word
Sorry Judith
Regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2008, 14:40 PM »
Greetings All,
I see you were all enjoying yerselves pun-bathing here while I was off sun-bathing this summer.

But now that I'm back, if we aspire to making a name for ourselves in the English/Spanish-speaking worlds of nature, we'll have far less of this pathological need certain iberianatureforumers have for bandying about scatological thoughts, thank you very much.

That said, Judith, with yer great "lewdicrous" you have shown yerself more than worthy of joining this great dreadful club of bloopers at iberianatureforum  :clapping:

Regs.,
Technopat
PS.
One of the many dilemmas I have to face as a semi-responsible parent bringing up kids in a semi-bilingual context is just how far to go/interfere in their sociolinguistic education :-X Any thoughts, hints, tips, soap mouthwash solutions welcome.
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Simon

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« Reply #14 on: September 24, 2008, 17:43 PM »
Demi. hemi or semi? :technodevil:

Simon