Iberianature Forum

Food in Spain

  • 49 Replies
  • 29262 Views

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Simon

  • *
  • Guest
« Reply #40 on: August 08, 2007, 20:57 PM »
Hi Guys and gals,

The revivification of this post is really wierd as I've been speaking all weekend about cheesey matters, especially Cabrales, Stilton, blue cheeses generally and a famous French maggoty cheese in particular (when you know a fewe catalan you find that you know the French branch of their families from the 1939 exodus too!) I'll hav to get back to C about the maggots but meanwhile check out Formatge del Tupi from the village of Sort in the Pyrenees - it's reinforced somewhat!

Si X

Offline lisa

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 2451
    • Accommodation and Activities in the Picos de Europa
« Reply #41 on: August 09, 2007, 07:14 AM »
I should just add that since then I have neither bought queso picón on the market nor used next-door's cold store room and that it's a really great cheese but best with some fruit and a glass of wine  8)
www.picos-accommodation.co.uk
Accommodation, ski touring, snowshoeing, walking and info on the flora and fauna of the Picos de Europa.
SAVE SPANISH BEARS!
And now,
The Picos de Europa
Your complete English guide to these beautiful mountains of Northern Spain.

Offline Dave

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 1306
  • León
« Reply #42 on: August 12, 2007, 13:52 PM »
Hi Everybody
Have just finished off some delicious Queso de Valdeon, Blue, very very strong, once again great with a decent tinto, apparently no one else in the family will touch it. Another thing this is often eaten with the maggots in, what won't kill you makes you fat.
Regards
Dave

Offline SueMac

  • *
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 720
    • Susan Bearder
« Reply #43 on: August 14, 2007, 09:27 AM »
Is -lo que no mata engorda - meant to be the equivalent of  -that which doesnt kill you makes you strong- ?
SueMac

Now mainly blogging on www.suevista.blogspot.com Vistas from Afar - A European Garden Blog

Offline Technopat

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 3021
« Reply #44 on: August 14, 2007, 10:26 AM »
Greetings Lisa, Dave, SueMac and All,
See your Spanish/English/Spanish is coming along nicely - but I'm sure you don't need me to tell you that :dancing:
Saludos,
Technopat

Ps.
As for Simon, he's light years ahead of the rest of us - I'm sure he knows the Catalan version also.
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 3021
« Reply #45 on: November 21, 2007, 14:31 PM »
Greetings All,
"A lot of rain has fallen" (Sp. anyone?) since I first mentioned it here, but came across a reference in El País today  to Serrat's wonderful Mas Perinet Priorat wine (yet another reason for Spain's conservatives to boycott Catalan products  :-X ).

Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Simon

  • *
  • Guest
« Reply #46 on: November 22, 2007, 06:21 AM »
Surely, 'Water under the bridge' TPs! Maybe we should have a fringe Summit at the camp site at Poboleda, ideal for both Priorat and MontSant - and at camping rates we may be able to afford a glass of these stellar wines that the ace Serrat is touting around the world!

Big recomendation for folks who don't know Serrat's work is 'Entre Todos los Mujeres' in which a wide range of female singers (well in one case a very wide range!) do thier own take on Serrats greatest hits!

Ciao!

Simon

Offline Spanish Footsteps

  • *
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 263
    • Spanish Footsteps
« Reply #47 on: November 26, 2007, 19:35 PM »
Hi All,

Great topic.

Not wishing to boost (well not too much) Soria has a fantastic range of locally produced fare and goes to great lenghts to ensure its known, well in Soria anyway. Making my decision upon moving here to try and source as much locally produce fare as possible, a lot easier than expected.  I am a big supporter of buying locally, obviously there are things I have become accustomed to including in my diet, that given Sorias climate etc cannot be grown locally, and in those instances I ensure its Spanish rather than imported.

Our local chain supermarkets (all 3 of them) have 'Productos de Soria' sections and labeling through out, making the trip to the supermarket relatively easy.  Sorians are very proud of their provinces reputation for clean air and great produce. The Diputacion de Soria regulates the local producers and 'hands' out Productos de Soria marks to those that make the grade.  We can find the usual items you'd expect: chorizo, cheese, milk, butter, honey, fantastic bread and pastries, lamb, mushrooms and truffles etc, but can also find biscuits, potatoes chips (crisps to those of you from the UK), tea, and herbal infusions and a great range of herabal based remedies, just to name a few.

Sorians have also managed something that was considered impossible Farming truffles!!! Its all a bit secretive, no one really knows how its done, but it is.  As Sorians haven't traditionally included truffles in their cuisine so a lot of the crop heads over the border to France but there are an ever increading number of fine dining restaurants including truffles on their menus. 

Well, now thats got me thinking of dinner...... ??? must be hungry

Louise

 
Discover the culturally rich province of Soria with Spanish Footsteps.
We provide unique walking holidays in Northern Spain.
For lovers of Nature, History and Culture.

www.spanishfootsteps.com

Unique walking holidays in Northern Spain

Offline Technopat

  • *
  • Full Shroomy
  • ******
  • Posts: 3021
« Reply #48 on: November 07, 2009, 15:37 PM »
Greetings All,
Interesting chat yesterday with a friend who works in the shipping industry re. quality of fruit 'n' veg. and import/export from/to Spain, and which ties in nicely with summat that's been worrying me for a long time see top o' this thread.

He told me that much of the stuff that now comes in prepared foods, such as pizzas, etc. and in frozen/tinned format, is imported mainly from China, among other places. This makes serious economic sense for companies as the production costs of things like asparagus are much lower.

On expressing my naive doubts as to the cost-effectiveness of bringing a container full of asparagus all the way from China, he challenged me to guess the cost of transporting same. Light-heartedly, I aimed low: a thousand euros. Wrong!

Correct answer: FIFTY euros per container! Obviously this refers to the transport  cost - not the value of the content.

Does anyone know if there are any mindless stats. out there for the carbon-print of a container load of asparagus from China, or similar?

A particularly unpleasant side effect of this container biz. is that the several containers that are stacked on deck, as opposed to those in the hold, are dumped overboard at the slightest hint of rough seas. Apart from the junk-in-sea aspect of it, they are also a hazard to small shipping as they don't don't immediately sink but remain floating just far enough below surface to not be seen, but not deep enough to avoid graunching a hole in the hull. Over to The Mollymawks for their bird's-eye view...

Meanwhile Spain, one of Europe's largest fruit 'n' veg producers and exporters has to import apples from Brazil...

Our local greengrocer - a guy we've been going to at least once a week for 16 years, refused to get imported stuff and went to ever greater lengths to get hold of Spanish produce - has just gone out of business. I realise that it's much easier for us all to get our stuff at the local supermarket, but I'd like to encourage those of you who are still in a position to do so, to help the local producers and sellers weather this crisis.

Not-feeling-all-that-bouyant regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Simon

  • *
  • Guest
« Reply #49 on: November 27, 2009, 10:36 AM »
Hi Technopat et al,

Sorry to have missed this one, lame excuses, etc. etc.
 
It's really bad news about a local trader going bust, especialy if they had an ethical/green(grocer  >:D) bias!

I saw on the news last night that the beaches down Almeria way are literally swamped with dumped brocolli that the Brits have sudenly refiused to import - no idea why, perhaps the strong Euro? But this may explain why there's so much brocolli in the supermarkets here these days. Good news for us perhaps - I just love it steamed and then dressed with the best olive oil and shreds of serrano, walnuts, raisins, . . .  8)

I recall a big polemica about drifting containers a few years ago when one sank that British lady yachting champ somewhere in the south Atlantic. Meanwhile, your fifty Euros sounds about right - containers are incredibly cheap, and I suspect 'green', to operate once they are on board and at sea; it's a  different picture the minute you put them on the back of a truck though!

Regs

Simon