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Links In Spanish

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Offline spanishfreelander

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« on: August 22, 2007, 09:24 AM »
Hi all,
I really enjoy going through the threads,finding out what other peoples views are on subjects,watching the banter from member to member...then BANG..
A link in spanish...full stop for me in that thread..
I have tried to translate what has been said..but it comes out as gobbledegook....

Im not saying  stop the links in spanish...we are in spain and to me they can be a help in learning the language..
Its just that it means a stop to my contribution to that thread as i dont know which way the conversation has "turned"...

So if i stop my contributions in any of the threads,i havnt taken the "huff", peeps...its just i dont know how to continue with the previous info thats been posted in "spanish"
Dave

Offline lisa

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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2007, 11:58 AM »
Guilty Dave - will try and add more translations to any of my Spanish lonks in an effort to improve the level of Spanish among our members  :dancing:
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2007, 14:48 PM »
'Ang about!
Before I begin with my answer to Dave's Dilemma  :technodevil: , could someone please explain to me Lisa's logic in translating her lonks into English to improve iberianatureforumers' level of Spanish. ???

I have nothing per se against translating Sp. originals into En. except for the fact that it's incredibly time-consuming - maybe summarising would be more efficient?

Two thoughts occur, which really have nothing much to do with it, but my cuppa's still too hot:

a) If you try to translate the following simple sentence "Children like milk" into Sp. using an automatic translator you get something like Los niños gustar leche, which gives you an idea of what is being talked about. Likewise, if you do it the other w. round – A los niños les gusta la leche, you get "To the boys them like the milk", which again gives you the gist but not much more. A more complex concept or sentence would play havoc with meaning. Does anyone have any exper. in these matters and or real knowledge?

b) I’ve gone and forgotten it! Ah, yes! For those of you not very familiar with Wikipedia, on the left hand side of the article page there are often, but not always, links to the equivalent page in another language – especially if the article is of a major subject. The articles are not always exactly the same - again, often, but not always, mere translated summaries of an original written in whichever language.

So if I were to embed a link to a Wikipedia article in Spanish – which I have been known to do on occasions – let’s take snake – you’d get to Serpiente with a short review of the subject (whereas the English version is more complete and often with more graphics, etc.) and to the left you’d see a list of languages where you can click on whichever one you feel more at ease with. This is particularly useful for a quick check on spelling or for the Cymraeg version, the Català, etc. Often, but again, not always, you’d expect an article on a typically Spanish theme to be more extensive than its equivalent in another language.
And again, for those of you not too familiar with W., don’t take everything that’s said there as gospel ‘cos given the dynamics of W. there’s lots of weird stuff going down, but it’s usually OK. By way of example, the contents of a page can change from one viewing to the next if someone has added new material or deleted something.)

Really must find a way of reducing the number of words I use when writing being more concise!

I'm-outta-here regs.,
Technopat
« Last Edit: June 15, 2008, 18:36 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Dave

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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2007, 17:51 PM »
Hi Dave and All
I must say I am guilty of using an automatic translator, and occasionally it is useful, if everything else fails I call on Mrs. Dave (Maria), but seperating her from her Sudoku is difficult.
Regards
Dave

Offline lisa

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« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2007, 23:12 PM »
I suppose for the time being I should just concentrate on perfecting my English. I meant translated summaries of course.
TP, you haven't by any chance read "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" by Mark Haddon, have you?

Trying to be more precise regards,
Lisa.
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2007, 01:24 AM »
Greetings Lisa and All,
From what I've read at the Wikipedia article you kindly posted, Lisa, I shall definitely NOT be taking that book with me to the beach next week. (Though judging from what Simon's been reading over recent weeks, it might be right up his street, him needing somewhat lighter reading, methinks).
So, apart from adding a spoiler template to the wikipedia article (after having read the plot), that's the nearest I'll be getting to reading that particular novel.

P. G. Wodehouse aka "English literature's performing flea" is what the doctor has ordered for switching off. As recommended by Spanish psychologists. I've probably mentioned it elsewhere, but Mrs Tp is a psychologist, and although her English is excellent, even she doesn't get 'alf of it  :technodevil:. But she does recommend Wodehouse to her clients.

Regs.,
Technopat

Ps.
I realise for those of you under the age of, let's say, 45, Wodehouse may seem just that little bit dated, but that's probably more due to preconceived ideas rather than from direct experience - as Evelyn Waugh said
Quote
Mr Wodehouse's idyllic world can never stale. He will continue to release future generations from captivity that may be more irksome than our own. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.

Some people might call it escapism , but in true Darwinian spirit, I call it a survival instinct survival of the fittest natural selection  :dancing:.

Pps. (for Lisa)  :technodevil:
Having lived with a psychologist for so many years does give one a somewhat, shall we say, different, outlook on life.
So rather than wonder why you were asking if I had read that particular novel, my question is (based on Gestalt therapy, which focuses more on process i.e. what is happening, than content i.e. what is being discussed, what makes you feel like asking me that?
To the layperson (and of course that includes me), that means the emphasis is on
Quote
what is being done, thought and felt at the moment rather than on what was, might be, could be, or should be. Gestalt therapy is a method of awareness, by which perceiving, and feeling are understood to be separate from interpreting, explaining and judging using old attitudes.

italics mine - from what is, by the way, a typical example of a crappy Wikipedia article, so I wouldn't actually bother clicking the link, but I have to acknowledge the source).

Ppps.
I've been meaning to mention it elsewhere, but keep forgetting, so I'll bring it up 'ere. My use of the wrod ex-pat has always been in the sense of ex-parrot, i.e. is no more. Those of us - a select few - who have been here (or abroad in general) longer than in our country of origin, and indeed have no intention whatsoever of returning, go through various stages of existentialism before arriving at Darwinism.

So, taken purely in that sense, the fact that I'm an ex-pat and have survived the experience of sharing more than half my life with a psychologist, plus Spain's copious late-night dinners, BBQs, levels of noise pollution, heat and the like, means that I'm pretty hard-boiled (with more emphasis on the hard-boiled than the pretty). So, with apologies to Stanley Turrentine: Don't Mess With Mr Tp!  8) (Whose only fault is that he still hasn't learnt to stick to the prescribed couple of lines  :banghead:)
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline lisa

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« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2007, 07:59 AM »
Long may the words last  :-*

P.S. Have always meant to read Wodehouse....among hundreds of others  ::)
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Accommodation, ski touring, snowshoeing, walking and info on the flora and fauna of the Picos de Europa.
SAVE SPANISH BEARS!
And now,
The Picos de Europa
Your complete English guide to these beautiful mountains of Northern Spain.

Offline Clive

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« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2007, 19:22 PM »
If you are following a topic Spanishfreelander and there is a bit of text from a news report or something then there is nothing wrong with babelfish http://babelfish.altavista.com/ or another online translator to help you out... In fact you get to see the original with the translation so that even helps you to see words that you will remember later...

Actually there is quite alot wrong with babelfish but it does work even if it mixes stuff up a bit and loses some context... You will at least get the idea of what is being said especially if you are following a subject on the topic. Some of the translations are really funny as well....

Try it out I'm sure it will help you. I use it quite a lot..

Clive
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Offline Dave

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« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2007, 19:41 PM »
Hi Dave and All
An on line translator I would recommend highly is http://translation2.paralink.com/. not perfect, but not bad.
Regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2007, 21:45 PM »
Greetings Folks,
 I love it - it's even made me forget this sultriness (great word from Dave's Collins :technodevil:) we're having these days here in Madrid!

So off I's went to Dave's online translator with hace bochorno and came out with, wait for it  :clapping:  it makes shame  :biggrin:

and then, now knowing what to expect, on to Clive's online t. and got it does shame  :dancing:

Regs.
Technopat

Ps.
Thanx for the laughs!

Pps.
Keep 'em coming!

Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Clive

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« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2007, 23:12 PM »
Well I didn't say it was perfect TP but a person who doesn't speak the lingo could at least get the gist of what is being said so that they could continue to follow topics whilst learning the lingo at the same time.

I have a feeling that as time goes by many people who don't understand any Iberian tongues will visit these discussions and the online translators as bad as they are are also a useful resource.

Clive
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Offline nick

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« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2007, 00:10 AM »
Agreed. There's so much to read anyway, and people will gravitate towards their own competences, which is what I think Spanishfreelander is hinting at. Translation is usally a drag though on occasions it can be fun.

But I'd also like to think that one of the grains of sand of the forum towards the Internet, will be, in addition to fostering love for nature, an incitement for people to learn or improve our Spanish, not to mention our English typing skils.
Nick
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #12 on: August 29, 2007, 00:21 AM »
Hear, hear, Nick!  :clapping:

As for Clive getting the gist with his online translating - bochorno on you, Sir!  :technodevil:

Regs.
Technopat
Ps
Which reminds me that I owe Nick an apology, not for something I've said or done, but for the bronca (En. anyone?) I was going to give him for not reading up on stuff at iberianatureforum before heading off on his Asturian travels - and when I was looking for the link to embed, it turns out that I didn't post the stuff ...  :-[ or as we polygluttons say ¡Vaya bochorno! - meet up with you at the food board.
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Dave

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« Reply #13 on: August 29, 2007, 10:36 AM »
Hi Everybody
Bronca - I think scolding is spot on if a little antiquated. from my own personal (in the kitchen at the moment) translator, reading up on Cheesecake recipes (the real thing) not the insipid ones you usually get, about 400 calories an ounce.
Regards
Dave

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2007, 13:10 PM »
Greetings Dave,
As you're (both?) in the kitchen, scolding is possibly the right term - be careful!
Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2007, 14:39 PM »
Greetings All,
As part of a serious attempt to be brief in my postings  :technodevil: will list everything by topic:

i.
Point I'm trying to make on this 'ere thread is that however much of a beginner we are in a language, we'll still get just as much of the gist from reading it cold - with help of dictionary, if necessary - than by using the state-of-the-art online translators.
At best, the only thing o. translators will do is highlight key words - if we can trust them to give the right meaning of that particular key word! (Today's mindless stat.: over 80% of words in English have at least two meanings).

ii. :lighttbulb: Suggestion for possible iberianatureforum user-friendly service: highlight (i.e. translate) keywords in Spanish texts posted here. Quicker than summarising and actively helps newly-arrived iberianatureforumers develop their own learning skills, if they need 'em.

iii. Examples of o. translations of wolf news posted recently:

a) Clive’s Babelfish:
Quote
The wolves kill 40 ewes in a ship located within San Adrián of the Valley the propietary number in 12.000 euros inflict casualties by the visit of canine the attack decreases 10% of the census of a race operation assaf, of great genetic value ...

b) And Dave’s:
Quote
The wolves kill 40 sheeps in a ship placed inside San Adrián of the Vale
The owner codes in 12.000 euros the losses caused by the visit of the cánidos
The attack reduces 10 % of the census of a puerblood development assaf, of big genetic value ...

iv. Conclusions:
a) The ONLY gist here is WOLF KILL SHEEP - and vete tú a saber (En. anyone?) what else!
b) I suspect most people's reaction would be "Spanish is impossibly difficult to learn - I may as well give up before even trying!"  :'(
c) The little extra effort (aka elbow grease) required in using a dictionary produces far better results, both short- and long term.

Regs.,
Technopat
« Last Edit: June 15, 2008, 18:44 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Sue

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« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2007, 19:52 PM »
iv. Conclusions:
a) The ONLY gist here is WOLF KILL SHEEP - what else!

In an enclosed area...ie...not on an open mountain side

Sue
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #17 on: October 10, 2007, 13:07 PM »
Greetings Sue,
Given that women might be better at reading between the lines than us mere men, and ever-eager to learn, am interested in knowing how one gets

Quote
In an enclosed area...ie...not on an open mountain side

from one of the very few words in which the two "translators" coincide - "ship". :technodevil:
Of course, having an extensive lexicon in Spanish and knowing that nave , apart from ship also means large building for industrial or commercial, etc. use does help...

Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline paulmatthews

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« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2007, 14:39 PM »
Paul & Angela Matthews

Offline Spanish Footsteps

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« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2007, 20:13 PM »
Another good site to learn espanish is notesinspanish.com 

An English guy and his Spanish wife do an excellent job, they have free (Si Gratis) podcasts that you can download.  They basically chat on topics (at learners pace) and the topics are very interesting.  You can play them in the background and its surprising how much you gain from it.

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