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Funghi mystery

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Offline glennie

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« on: September 23, 2007, 22:35 PM »
This little laddie is obviously ' in a relationship' with the rotting tree stump which can also be seen in the photo.

I don't know his name and, unfortunately, I don't know what it is a stump of, though it is almost definitely either a pine or an oak.

I came across it today when out and about  nr. La Isla, which is between El Paular and Los Cotos in the Valle del Lozoya, about 90 km from Madrid.

Any ideas micologists?
« Last Edit: September 23, 2007, 22:42 PM by glennie »

Offline lisa

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« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2007, 06:59 AM »
Hi Glennie, at first glance it looks like oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus) but then again could be a Crepidotus, of which there are a few. See Fungorum.
Colours vary hugely and you should check the colour of the spore.
Check out the Sociedad de Micologica de Madrid.
We'll see what our resident expert thinks  :technodevil:
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2007, 11:21 AM »
Greetings Glennie and Lisa and All,
Lisa stuck 'er boot in first (the female of the s. and all that  :technodevil:) and says just 'bout all there is to say on the matter. The cultivated oysters always seem to be wanner and greyer than the ones we come across in the wild - hardly surprising, really. Bit like all those poor factory hens, I s'pose.

As I've said before, and I'll say it again - I'd never eat a wild 'shroom that hadn't been selected and picked by an expert who'd convincingly convinced me that s/he were fully versed in 'shrooms.

Apart from appreciating their succulent flesh and distinctive taste, my love of 'shrooms is mainly aesthetic - and the awe at their amazing variety - and I love coming across 'em in the wild, but never pick 'em.

Click 'ere for some close up pics. posted on iberianatureforum by ValL early this summer.

Regs.
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline lisa

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« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2007, 18:06 PM »

Lisa stuck 'er boot in first (the female of the s. and all that  :technodevil:)
Nah, you mean the early bird gets the 'shroom, surely?
www.picos-accommodation.co.uk
Accommodation, ski touring, snowshoeing, walking and info on the flora and fauna of the Picos de Europa.
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And now,
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Offline glennie

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« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2007, 21:25 PM »
Thanks for your assistance!  :-*

Offline spanishfreelander

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« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2007, 23:36 PM »
Hi All,
agree with you totally TP,
I love mushrooms and have seen many on my early morning fishing trips in the uk,but would never ever, pick any from the wild.
Leave it to the experts as you said.
Dave