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Cloudburst = gota fría?

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Offline Technopat

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« on: September 25, 2007, 08:36 AM »
Greetings All,
It's that time of year again, and while we have threads on drought, forest fires and other phenomena, not sure if we have one on large amounts of rain coming down like a ton of bricks, although I'm sure I've seen postings referring to goldball-sized hailstones somewhere.

Remember (I think) Clive or Sue once mentioning that their neck of the woods was especially damp - has the rain that caused the recent flooding in Almuñecar been apparent up in Grazalema or is it too far away (as the crow flies)?
Regs.,
Technopat
« Last Edit: February 06, 2008, 23:09 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline nick

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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2007, 15:47 PM »
Cut-off low is the technical term TP

Great description here using flash:

http://www.consumer.es/web/es/medio_ambiente/naturaleza/2004/08/12/140158.php
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Offline nick

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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2007, 15:53 PM »
Interestingly, the Spanish term is an early 1940s translation of the German term. Now I wonder why there were lots of German meteologists in 1941 in Spain?

"Gota" refers to the shape of the cold air mass (like a droplet) and not as is sometimes understood (once by me!) of cold drops falling on yer head.

Unuusally, the Spanish wikipedia entry is more complete than the English one:
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gota_fr%C3%ADa
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_drop. In English it's known as a CUT_OFF LOW as the Spanish page rightly points out, not a COLD DROP!
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Offline nick

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« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2007, 16:08 PM »
From here:
http://hispagua.cedex.es/documentacion/especiales/desastres_naturales/desastres_espana.htm

Quote
El origen de la "gota fría" surge en el año 1886 en la escuela alemana, que introdujo el término "kaltlufttropfen", cuya traducción significa aproximadamente "gota fría". Este término se arraigó en España ya que la escuela alemana influyó mucho en el antiguo Servicio Meteorológico Nacional español. Con el paso de los años se acuñó otro término de origen anglosajón denominado "cutt-off low" que puede traducirse como depresión o baja aislada. Meteorológicamente, este término se bautizó en España como Depresión Aislada de Niveles Altos (DANA).
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Offline Clive

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« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2007, 17:41 PM »
Quote
Remember (I think) Clive or Sue once mentioning that their neck of the woods was especially damp - has the rain that caused the recent flooding in Almuñecar been apparent up in Grazalema or is it too far away (as the crow flies)?
Regs.,
Technopat

Barely a drop Tp!

Its very strange because the shiny new visitor centre in the next town is still showing that 2000 litres a year falls here in Grazalema... Well my house is 7 KM from Grazalema and my garden is the driest it has ever been...  :(

Clive
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Offline Sue

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« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2007, 20:06 PM »
Hi TP,
 we took these photos while waiting for the road to emerge after a cloud burt raveged  cleared ground under olive trees back in September.
It was just south of Teba (Malaga province near Antequera).

A 20 minute wait allowed crossing for most vehicles!

Regards, Sue
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2007, 23:27 PM »
Greetings Sue,
Thanx for the pics.
Hope that's not the the quiet neck of the woods Clive's reserving for me to pitch me tent in! Would get muddy footmarks in the tent and Mrs. Tp would have kittens! (Sp. anyone?)

Django Reinhardt famously always had the taps running when he slept in hotels on tour, as he needed to hear the sound of bubbling brooks, but I have no special wish to do anything similar (both dangerous and poco ecológico).

I actually meant to put a question mark in the title of this thread, as in "How would y'all translate gota fría?"

Regs.,
Technopat
« Last Edit: February 06, 2008, 23:10 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline lisa

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« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2007, 08:27 AM »
In that case Tp, after Nick's scientific meteorological terms how about this non one beloved by weather forecasters in the Place of Pies - cold snap?
P.S. Not sure about crazy jazz musician's idiosyncratic habits. What was he on? Must have had a strong bladder anyway  ;D
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2007, 13:42 PM »
Greetings Sue and Clive,
Clive's last posting on this thread (
Quote
... the shiny new visitor centre in the next town is still showing that 2000 litres a year falls here in Grazalema... Well my house is 7 KM from Grazalema and my garden is the driest it has ever been..
) surprised me then but this morning's news of serious rain damage in Utrera and Ecija raises serious concerns as to the patch reserved for the Technopat tent at the summit - April showers or April cloudbursts?
well-being of Sue and Clive.

Regs.,
Technopat

PS.
Hope Wildside stone wall well-built enough to resist "lo que caiga" or "a lo que le echas".
« Last Edit: February 06, 2008, 23:10 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Clive

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« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2007, 14:01 PM »
Rainfall here last night was absolutely rubbish! Don't worry Tp. We need a lot more than that pathetic effort to top up the aquifers and lakes. It rained for about 6 hours and then turned to grey cloud.... Right now it is cloudy but bright... I think we had about 50 litres per square metre max....

Walls are still up but the wind took down 3 big poplar trees (chopos) That we have spent the morning cutting up to dry for use in the fireplace... :)
Explore the nature of Iberia at www.wildsideholidays.com

The beautiful town of Ronda, the City of Dreams?

The spectacular Caminito del Rey, El Chorro and Guadalhorce reservoirs El Camino del Rey

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2009, 10:10 AM »
Greetings All,
Yet another great thread that seems to have gotten itself lost in the mists o' time :noidea: - not quite so specific and up-to-date as the  What's the weather doing on your patch? thread.

Large amounts of rain fell yesterday on Cartagena, a major town/city on the Med, which was cut off for several hours. South of Valencia also had large amounts of rain. Jesús' Indalo country was also pretty damp. Albacete is on red alert today. Same cloud formation moving inland?

Contrary to what the headlines say, chappie from aemet talking on radio yesterday said that what was happening in Murcia/Cartagena was not a gota fria, and proceeded to give incredibly complicated explanation as to why it wasn't  :banghead: (Don't s'pose I'm the only one who gets frustrated when listening to an expert explaining something in such a way as to leave one more confused than before... My level of Spanish is excellent  :dancing: and I'm a reasonably well-educated and intelligent sort of person :technodevil: so how come I didn't get a word of what he was saying, except that it wasn't a gota fria...)

I'm hoping that Nick will pop in 'ere and sort this one out, but from the little I understand/understood, the gota fria results from high temperatures building up over time and the clouds then discharging sharply, but for a brief period.

Wellies-and-brollies-no-good-these-days-(Tp-keeps-'is-snorkel-'n'-flippers-in-back-of-car) regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Maria

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« Reply #11 on: September 29, 2009, 14:20 PM »
A couple of years to late on this but we witnessed the gota fria first hand in 2007 (on my birthday), it was an amazing experience.

First thing we noticed was the sky turning a real mean green colour, (should have taken a photo but didnt), then the view started getting shorter and shorter and realised whatever it was was heading straight for us  :o, it started to rain, so we went under cover, then the wind hit knocking the trees over from side to side and then the hail started so we ran inside with the dogs and shut the door, big hail stones fell, the noise in the house was incredible. It was like what I imagine it to be like in a hurricane. It only lasted about half an hour but caused an amazing amount of damage, all the leaves, flowers etc were knocked off and those that did survive looked like a machine gun had gone through them. We lost all our veg, terraces collapsed, our house flooded and car windows were smashed. Never seen or been in anything like it  :speechless:

We took a short, not great quality, video if you want to see it