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ceps (fungi)

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Offline shiner

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« on: October 16, 2007, 12:24 PM »
the locals are busy rooting through the pine trees and fetching bag fulls of "cepes" off the hill can any one suggest a web page for fungi ID what they collect look really meaty

Offline lisa

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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2007, 09:24 AM »
Hi Shiner, look for Boletus. There are some nice photos on this nature website nature and , of course, there's always the old iberia nature forum favourite the bloobook.
Here's a beauty one of our guests picked this week. Didn't had time to check it out properly so it remained uneaten  :(
« Last Edit: October 17, 2007, 09:27 AM by lisa »
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Offline shiner

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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2007, 11:33 AM »
many thanks Lisa that nature page was just what I was looking for-- now heading up the hill to hit the pine covered slopes befor the locals return at the week-end- er any cooking tips?

Offline Clive

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« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2007, 12:30 PM »
Be careful Shiner is my tip! :)

It terrifies me to think someone is off into the campo with some printouts from a web site on mushroom identification....

Clive
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Offline Technopat

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« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2007, 13:22 PM »
Greetings All,
Just seen Clive's dire warning, to which I fully subscribe. If you have the slightest doubt, the decision is clear: DO NOT EAT.

Illustrations/glossy pics. from a book/web site are definitely NOT an adequate means of ID-ing 'shrooms. There are so many variables, other than what we see, involved.

Nor are the locals necessarily the best people to rely on for correct ID. Many people are reluctant to admit that they simple don't know. Many local organisations now run ID services and/or courses

Likewise 'shroom forums. An especially active one that I came across once had an apparently very clearly identified specimen, with shots taken from different angles, 3 or 4 people congratulating the person for such a wonderful contribution - and 3 days later, the resident "expert" logged in and told the guy not to eat it 'cos it could only be positively ID-ed using a microscope. And the consequences could be unpleasant. The thread ran out at that point ...

On the other hand, established sources vary as to the relative edibility/toxicity of certain 'shrooms.

As for the delicious Boletus edulis - cep/Penny Bun Bolete itself, it grows in both coniferous and deciduous forests and young specimens are very easily confused - and grow next to - Tylopilus felleus, which, although not poisonous has a bitter taste (although the scent is pleasant!).

If your locals are off to the pine woods, possibly what they are picking is Boletus pinicola (boleto de pino) which is also delicious http://www.telecable.es/personales/jmmm1/MICOLOGIA/boletus_pinicola.htm. Trouble is, as is so often the case, the specimen in the pic. here looks nothing like the pic. I use as a reference.

And of course not all Boletus are edible. As I mentioned elsewhere, there's the Devil's Bolete, common in the south of the LOG, and while not deadly, and easily identified (?), can cause violent vomiting.

That said, the following web site/page http://www.micologia.net/gastronomia/gastronomia.htm has a couple of "recetas for setas" for boletus and recommendations for preservation. But I personally always sauté 'shrooms in a little garlic and the tiniest pinch of salt and black pepper. (Except, of course, if it's a 'shroom that is poisonous unless boiled ... :dancing:)

Regs.
Technopat

« Last Edit: October 17, 2007, 14:09 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Jill

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« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2007, 17:23 PM »
An expert - a man leading courses on mushroom identification - once told me that there are no spongy-type DEADLY poisonous mushrooms. (Spongy as opposed to the sort with gills. I've forgotten the technical name.) Is this true?

Jill

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2007, 19:38 PM »
Greetings Jill and All,
As I mentioned elsewhere, 
Quote
established sources vary as to the relative edibility/toxicity of certain 'shrooms.
and what is one manperson's meat is another's poison ...

The epitome of poisonous 'shrooms, the Fly Agaric, was once considered deadly but is now only considered toxic, or more specifically, as having hallucinogenic effects. Likewise 'shrooms once considered edible, such as the Common or Brown Roll-rim are now known to be deadly http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paxillus_involutus

If by "spongy" 'shrooms you refer to boleti, as in Penny Buns etc., while many are among the most delicious, there are also many that are inedible 'cos they are too bitter - resulting in people spitting 'em out and possibly not getting a fatal dose.

As I mentioned earlier, the most famously poisonous boletus is Boletus satanas - Devil's Bolete, and there was a recorded death from eating Boletus pulcherrimus in 1994.

Just so no-one drops their guard, recent developments in ID techniques have established that several agarics now belong to the boleti ...

Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline shiner

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« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2007, 11:53 AM »
MANY THANKS TECHNOPAT YOUR INFO HAS CONVINCED, ME I'LL LEAVE THE VAROIUS FUNGI IN THE PINES WELL ALONE AND PLAY SAFE, TEDDY BEARS PICTNIC'S ONLY

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2007, 12:53 PM »
Greetings Shiner,
Oh dear! I hope I haven't put you off your feed! I love 'shrooms but have turned down many "gifts" from people who have been out collecting and wanted to give me some of their pickings. Many poisonous 'shrooms grow next to edible ones and the toxins can transfer from one to t'other if placed in the same basket. One should only ever pick one's own 'shrooms and not trust to someone else. That's why, unless I have a positive ID and absolutely NO doubt - I stick to looking at the myriad variations in the wild and marvel at their diversity. Call me paranoid if you like, but I call it survival instinct. An analogy would be people's initiation into drugs, tobacco and alcohol included. SueMac, having worked in that area will bear me out on this (I hope), but most people start 'cos a friend, or someone they have no reason to distrust, tells them that they've been taking/doing whatever and that there are no side-effects. But by the time they start noticing anything weird, it's very/too difficult to kick. But I digress?

Can't stop now, but when I get in this evening, I'll post an interesting article on poisonous 'shrooms ... :dancing:

Regs.,
Technopat

PS. Sorry for the lecture, but 'shroom picking is not as easy as birdwatching or trout-tickling :technodevil:
« Last Edit: October 22, 2007, 15:56 PM by Technopat »
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline Jill

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« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2007, 12:34 PM »
Hi TP

I am looking forward to reading your post on trout tickling! (I've always fancied trying that.)

Offline shiner

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« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2007, 12:52 PM »
Many thanks TECHNO do tell about your trout tickling experiences--me I use a well tied fly

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2007, 23:59 PM »
Greetings Jill and shiner,
Would love to, not that there's much to tell, but a) the Powers-that-B. disapprove of anecdotes referring to bucolic life in the LOG, and b) aforementioned P-that-B will only accept actual bites/stings as opposed to near misses (choosing to ignore, of course, the fact that if that short-sighted giant croc. hadn't misjudged his/her aim or if I hadn't been able to run into the sea and keep my head down and escape those killer bees, or if the giant manta had been just that little bit more jumpy or just plain crotchety, there wouldn't be any Technopat to tell the tale) :technodevil:
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266