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Fungus on almond trees

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Offline SueMac

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« on: October 21, 2007, 19:43 PM »
Hi there
Can anyone say what fungi are associated with almond trees. I am seeing fungi on the trees and fungi under the trees.
SueMac
SueMac

Now mainly blogging on www.suevista.blogspot.com Vistas from Afar - A European Garden Blog

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2007, 20:12 PM »
Greetings SueMac,
When you say fungus, are you referring to large visible growths such as oyster mushrooms or delicate mould-like powder?

At first glance on Google, came up with Aspergillus flavus which is common to many nuts,as well as animal fodder, and in fact all the nuts we buy in shops - and the grain given to animals we eat - have been routinely doused in large amounts of pesticide to fight against it ...

On the other hand, one of my 'shroom books says that much is made of the presence of such moulds and that they are no more harmful than other mycotoxins - of which alcohol is one of the strongest.

Now that you mention it, do remember seeing old almonds on trees being covered in a blackish mould, mildew?

Will try to see what other fungi are involved - any pics?

Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline SueMac

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« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2007, 21:20 PM »
Hi TP Can do but it involves a tricky walk down into boar territory and I cant run anymore.... One fungus is waves of whitish grey fungus quite low on old trees and the other is pretty fairy like brown bells. SueMac
SueMac

Now mainly blogging on www.suevista.blogspot.com Vistas from Afar - A European Garden Blog

Offline SueMac

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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2007, 14:58 PM »
Hello TP
This is the small fungi under the tree.
SueMac
SueMac

Now mainly blogging on www.suevista.blogspot.com Vistas from Afar - A European Garden Blog

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2007, 18:01 PM »
Greetings SueMac,
Right, my first go for ID-ing little skinny 'shrooms growing round tree stumps and trees, could be, but I'm sure it's not a) Coprinus micaceus Glistening Ink Cap (not edible); b) my candidate would be Coprinus disseminatus; c) Marasmius scorodonius – garlic smell (edible) or d) Marasmius alliaceus; or e) another strong contender would be Marasmius cohaerens; f) Anellaria semiovata, but this one grows on or near horse dung and you made no mention ...
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline SueMac

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« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2007, 21:55 PM »
Hi TP et al
I've got a new book :dancing: what about clytocybe fragrans?
SueMac
SueMac

Now mainly blogging on www.suevista.blogspot.com Vistas from Afar - A European Garden Blog

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2007, 18:51 PM »
Greetings SueMac,
Not at all convinced by the Clytocybe fragrans, but there's naught like first-hand experience, so won't argue with you if you insist ...

Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266

Offline SueMac

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« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2007, 20:19 PM »
Hi TP
Dont insist but curious about reasoning......

SueMac
SueMac

Now mainly blogging on www.suevista.blogspot.com Vistas from Afar - A European Garden Blog

Offline Technopat

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« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2007, 22:51 PM »
Greetings SueMac,
My obtuse reasoning is based on my Usually Reliable Sources which I can't post but which coincide with the image in the 8th row down at the following URL:
http://www.pbase.com/terrythormin/new_photos

As I've oft-repeated, likenesses in books and photos can be very misleading ...

Regs.,
Technopat
Technopat's disclaimer: If this posting seems over the top and/or gets your goat (Sp. anyone?), please accept my apologies and don't take it personally - it's just my instinctive tendency to put my foot in it whenever/wherever possible. See also:
http://www.iberianatureforum.com/index.php/topic,266